High voltage, high power circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rentiantong123, Apr 10, 2015.

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  1. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
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    Hi, every one.
    Is there any circuit of high power amplifier which can amplify 24V car battery to 2000V-3000V, working around 4000w? (Very short time period usage)
    Either product on market or design plan helps!
    Anyone familiar with high power circuit design please help me.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,137
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    In this application it is not called amplification. We amplify signals, but we convert power. To convert power from a low voltage high current source to a high voltage low current source we employ one of a small number of toplogies to accomplish this. These circuits are all non-linear and have the following feature in common:
    Code (Text):
    1.  
    2. POWER OUT is strictly less than POWER IN
    3.  
    To answer you question
    3000 Volts at 4000 Watts requires 1.333 Amperes
    24 Volts at 4000 Watts requires approximately 167 Amperes
    BUT since no conversion process is 100% efficient we need to increase that to say 210 Amperes.
    You do not want to be and probably cannot handle such high currents. They can and will vaporize your wires, or at least the insulation.
     
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  3. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    you dont want to handle those hogh voltage wires, without some safety training. there might be some power supplies available for ham radio power amplifiers, they made some for mobiles using 12 volts. maybe even some dynamoters for airborn useage in ww2 vintage surpluss.
     
  4. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    I have no idea what you're planning but it's very dangerous to design/operate power supplies in that output range as you usually don't get a second chance if it can deliver stable power for more than a very short pulse. I would use an inverter to generate normal utility 220 VAC voltages so a commercial unit could be used.

    A continuous duty supply.
    http://www.glassmanhv.com/ByWattage/lk_series.shtml#Models
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2015
  5. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    Please define "(Very short time period usage)".
     
  6. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    If it was me I would stat with a suitably sized power inverter followed bytwo large microwave oven transformers with their secondaries in series .

    Easy to build 2 - 3KV power source from common parts. ;)
     
  7. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    The fact that you are having to post your question suggests that you have little practical experience of high voltage circuits and their hazards. Your project could prove LETHAL :eek:. What load requiring 4kW will you be using.
     
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  8. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If you want to fire a microwave oven magnetron at radar trop cops - I don't reccomend it.

    Besides, the heater takes a while to warm up.
     
  9. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    What car uses 24 volts?
     
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  10. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    The first time he tries to work on it "live".
     
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  11. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your detailed reply.
    I am trying to lower the power now.
     
  12. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your reply.:)
    I think a inverter is what I need now.
     
  13. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    What is the purpose of this project? You really need to provide more detail, though honestly I don't see this happening. It's dangerous and will probably not work (As mentioned, it'll likely fry your cables, and quite possibly yourself).
     
  14. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your reply.
    I am building a charging circuit for a huge capacitor used for MRI.
    High voltage voltage is what I need and high power is for quick charging.
    I think a inverter and amplifiers is what I need.:)
     
  15. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    An amplifier is NOT what you need. Read the replies.

    Why do you need to charge a huge capacitor? Is this some sort of EMP gun?
     
  16. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your reply.
    I put two 12V car battery in series.:)
    What I am doing is building a charging circuit for a huge capacitor. The power in capacitor will be used for MRI.
    I need voltage as high as 2000V-3000V for my antenna and high power is for high speed charging.
     
  17. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your reply.
    It is used for MRI. It does like a EMP gun:)
    Yes, I think a inverter is what I need.
     
  18. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
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    Thanks for your reply.:)
    This is the best plan I have now.
    I may still need to consider power problems.
     
  19. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your concern.
    I don't have any experience of high power design. That's why a commercial solution is better for me.
    The 4kW power source will be used for charging up a 2000V-3000V huge capacitor used for MRI. So it will work for probably few seconds.
     
  20. rentiantong123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 29, 2014
    23
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    Thanks for your reply.
    That's not what I trying to do.:)
     
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