high speed clocking in of data FIFO question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by baringforge, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. baringforge

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I'm mainly a software guy, with enough hardware prototyping experience to be dangerous :) I have an application I'm working on where I want to clock in serial data from a device at 4 Mb/s. I tried adding a shift register in, but I still get 4,000,000 / 8 interrupts per second to my poor little Coldfire cpu.

    I'd like to incorporate a deep fifo in the mix so I can go out and read in a bunch of data once in awhile via dma on my data bus or whatever. Something like a "Serial to parallel fifo", like the IDT72142 would be pure gold, but it's obsolete, probably because everyone uses FPGAs nowadays. Does anyone know of a good way to clock serial data into a fifo, then pull it out in parallel (8 or 16 bit)? I was thinking about doing an FPGA, but I'd like to just drop in an IC and get this done.

    Thanks !
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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  3. baringforge

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Thanks for the reply. It could be that I'm lost, but I'm not sure that using a 74hc594 buys me much more than I already have. I'm already using a shift register (74hc164). I'd like to be able to buffer up at least 4Kbit so I only have to pull out data at 1ms periods.

    I've got a:
    http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=800-1507-5-ND

    This is a neat 2048X9 fifo, but I can't get from my shift register into that, so I was hoping to find a fairly deep fifo I can populate serially.
     
  4. baringforge

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 30, 2010
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    It's kinda weird. There doesn't appear to be any SIPOs available anywhere, by anyone. It seems like there would at least be a market for these things.
     
  5. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    That's because the capability is inherent in most programmable devices, manipulated with simple software routines/switches.
     
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