High frequency generator

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Sparky49, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Hi all,

    I have had a idea and would like to conduct some experiments on the idea.

    However, I need a very high frequency wave. As high as possible.

    At the moment, I cannot afford some of the ready made instruments, so I thought I would have a go (at least) of making my own source.

    May I ask what method would be best to produce the highest possible frequency signal? I'm not looking for huge amplitudes, really the only factor I'm interested in (at the moment) is a really very, very high frequency signal.


    Thank you very much for your time. I will try to remember to post the results of my experiments when they are done. I think they will be very interesting.

    We will see.

    Sparky
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    What range of frequencies are you looking for?
    How high is the highest needed frequency?
    What should be the frequency stability needed?

    Bertus
     
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  3. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,148
    1,791
    You can make a Gunn diode oscillator at about 10 GHz or so. In order to play in this sandbox you need instruments that cost as much as a house to figure out what is wrong when things don't work as expected. There's no free lunch and you can't get a lot for very little. Sound about right?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunn_diode#Gunn_diode_oscillators

    Last time I checked the DX record at 405 GHz. was just over a kilometer using a big dish aimed with a 10x rifle scope.
     
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  4. K7GUH

    Member

    Jan 28, 2011
    191
    23
    I can generate up to 25 watts output in the 902-938 MHz range.
     
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  5. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    The blue-violet lasers in Blu-Ray discs and HD DVD drives emit at a wavelength of 405nm, which is a frequency of ≈740,000 GHz.:D
     
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  6. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    really ??? 740 Tera-Hertz ??? :eek: Thatz one cookin' freq.
     
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  7. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Yes. visible light is very high in frequency. Half-wave dipoles a just a bit impractical however, and connectors on that scale are also problematical -- ROFLMAO
     
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  8. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Ha, lol.

    "I am having trouble picking anything up"

    Thanks for the suggestions, they are all (mostly ;)) very good. I think I might go down the Gunn diodes.

    Many thanks! :)
     
  9. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Remember not to look down the barrel of a Gunn diode. You might get powder burns.
     
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  10. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    No, 2.45GHz is one cookin' freq.
    Sorry, couldn't resist.:D
     
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  11. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,023
    3,236
    Since you are talking high frequency, X-rays have a wavelength in the range of 0.01 to 10 nanometers, corresponding to frequencies in the range of 30 petahertz to 30 exahertz (3×10^16 Hz to 3×10^19 Hz). Perhaps you want an industrial X-ray machine? :rolleyes:
     
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  12. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Mmhmmm...

    They sound a bit long.

    Gamma rays should suffice. ;)
     
  13. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  14. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
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    Ron...........I'll shoot you next time.......................wait a dang minute..........this IS next time !!!! BANG !! :D
     
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