High Current for the Production of Carbon Nanotubes

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by iVoid, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. iVoid

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2012
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    I am testing some theories for the production of carbon nano tubes using the Arc discharge method. Long story short, I need an AC supply of about 100 amps and approximately 20 Volts to vaporize the graphite electrodes.

    I look at this and immediately think transformer. I can use one to step down the voltage and in turn raise the current. I am familiar with the formula. Assuming I have a fairly accurate 120Volts AC from the wall with 20 Amps, I would need a turns ratio of 5:1 to produce 100 Amps at 24 volts. I also know that I should put a 20 Amp fuse at the plug.

    However I understand the extreme safety risks that are involved with high current and I recognize that this is a lot more than enough current to be fatal. That is why I want the thoughts, opinions and recommendations of you guys before I end up blowing myself up. Or am I looking at it completely wrong?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
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    I would be more worried about touching the primary side of this transformer.

    24V is not high enough to give you deadly shock, unless maybe you are touch both ends with bleeding hands. (direct body fluid contact)

    The main danger with low voltage/high currents is exactly what you want to do: arc creation. Since you do not want an arc where there should be none you have to make sure to use the properly rated cable gauge, the right terminals and properly tightend srews where this current flows through.

    You should use safety glasses. I would personnally also use gloves too, to protect against possible burns from unexpected arcing.
     
  3. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Sounds like what you need is a welder. My Lincoln 225 amp welder has a secondary voltage of 26 volts if I'm not mistaken.
     
  4. iVoid

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2012
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    Thanks for the tips. The arc itself will occur in a sealed chamber (if all goes well), but those precautions will be taken.

    The welder seems like a good idea. I don't know why I didn't think of that. I will definitely look further into various welder schematics, but just at face value, what benefits would there be with using a welder circuit (or similar) rather than just building a transformer (assuming there is more to a welder than a transformer)?
     
  5. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Don't think you could build a efficient DIY transformer of that size for the price of a welder.
     
  6. iVoid

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2012
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    About how big would this transformer have to be?
     
  7. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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  8. GregTuve

    New Member

    Nov 9, 2012
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    Can't help but, "Carbon Nanotubes." Cool. If you can figure out how to weave them into a fabric, you could get rich in the first round.
     
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