HI, Im new and have some questions?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by asilva, Jul 8, 2006.

  1. asilva

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2006
    6
    0
    Hi everyone,

    I am thinking about getting an associates degree at :
    http://itt-tech.edu/campus/courses.cfm
    itt tech for computer and electronics technology, what are you thoughts about this program and do you think I will get a good job from this, what is starting pay around? I like electronics and taking things apart and re-assembling them, will I be good for this job?

    any help would be great
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
    214
    Greetings Asilva,

    ITT TECH is a well established learning institute providing a broad range of courses in field of electronics. You should be able to choose the one that best fits the career path in which you are interested.

    As for you question on the starting salary, I recommend you check with ITT Tech. I am sure they can provide statistics on the starting salaries of its graduates.

    Your last question "Will I be good at this job?" is the toughest one to answer. Based on my experience as an electronic design engineer for 30+ years, your success in this field will hinge on your passion for the job. A mentor of mine once gave me some wise advice, he said that if you love your job you will never work a day in your life. I have found that to be true.

    Good Luck,
    hgmjr
     
  3. asilva

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2006
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    0
    what types of jobs, other that service is there in this industry? and is there a demand for them or is it hard to land a job?
     
  4. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    I apologies that I cannot give you more US-specific advice, though I'm sure the situation is the same as it is in the UK.

    Embarking on a career in the electronics industry is a somewhat daunting proposition, particularly since in the next 20-or-so years it will become the worlds largest industry (if it hasn't already done so). There are many posibilities for engineers of all creeds and skill-levels. At one end you have the practical-based side of electronics (technicians etc) who work in the more hands-on elements, and at the other end there is the academic-based side of electronics (University lecturers and research associates) who deal more with the mathematical and theoretical aspects of electroninc engineering. And there are positions at every conceivable stage in-between. You need to ensure whatever training you undertake, that it accuractely reflects what you want, and what you are capable of.

    As for whether you will be good at it, well that is a combination of whether to choose to educate yourself to your own personal strengths (knowing your strengths and weaknesses is a massive help) and also how committed you are to what you learn. hgmjr has hit it on the head with his above comments.

    As for pay, well more often than not that is just a case of right place at the right time. One thing is for sure: in engineering you will always have a job, and you will always live comfortabley. Thats said, you still might not own that Ferrari and yacht you always wanted!!

    Best of luck in whatever you decide to do, as long as your honest whatever you decide will be the right decision.

    Dave
     
  5. asilva

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2006
    6
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    Thanks dave I appreciate that post greatly, but do you honestly think an associates degree is good in this field?
     
  6. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    Forgive me, but I don't know what an associates degree is. Do you know what the equivalent qualification is in the UK? What are the general prerequisits (high-school qualification, sixth-form etc) and what is the usual age-band for doing such a course?

    Edit: Ok so I have looked on Wikipedia at what an associates degree is (see here). It claims that an associates degree is equivalent to a Foundation degree, which in the UK is usually used as a stepping stone to a full undergradute degree. If this is a viable option for the associates degree you wish to undertake, then I see it as a step in the right direction. In the UK, most people don't actually to Foundation degrees, but HNC/HND qualifications as part as an apprenticeship. Have you considered this as an option? The advantage of an apprenticeship is that you gain good practical/vocational skills which enhance your employability, whilst providing good enough acadmenic skills to progress in a university environment. My advice would be to speak to a careers advisor who will be able to provide more detailed advice based on your personal circumstances.

    Sadly, with the questions you ask, there are no right or wrong answers.

    Dave
     
  7. asilva

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2006
    6
    0
    can someone please list what types of jobs other than service jobs, that would hire me after I graduate from the ITT tech electronics associates degree?
     
  8. asilva

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2006
    6
    0
    anyone????
     
  9. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
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    Again this probably has more to do with the fact that I'm from the UK and you are from the US, but what exactly are Service Jobs?

    From what I can deduce from the equivalent qualifications in the UK, people who study for HNC/HND/Foundation Degrees, tend to work in skilled technical (generally manual) vocations. Examples include: manufacturing, track-side support engineering, maintenance etc. The list is limitless and its is too difficult to say what jobs are available to a person - this is mostly dependant on circumstances within the company/industry at that point and what skills-package the potential employee has. The sort of engineering jobs that will beyond someone with an associates degree are those that require professional registration as a prerequisite; examples include system design engineers, senior manufacturing engineers/managers and R&D engineers.

    Sadly, this topic is too broad and there are no real answers to the questions you are asking, its a case of you have to look at the possibilities and deduce whether this potentially suits your needs. I'm afraid this is probably the best advice I could give to you. I still advise you have a word with a careers advisor, particularly one at the institution you are looking at attending - they will have come across the questions you are asking here many times before.

    Dave
     
  10. Erin G.

    Senior Member

    Mar 3, 2005
    167
    1
    With an associates you could probably get your foot in the door in a utility, such as a power plant or phone company, fairly easily. There are also a lot of technician level positions in manufacturing. As Dave notes, the possiblities are endless. These are generally shift-work positions with good pay and bennefits, and are not "service" jobs.
     
  11. mozikluv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 22, 2004
    1,437
    1
    hi,

    have just read this post and the replies were all terrific serving as an eye opener for you. however being an employer myself, i always like job applicants who can envision themselves where they will be in the company if in case they are employed after 2, 5 and 10 years after.

    for me it's not a question of who will hire you because as the company progresses there will always be a need. but the big question is how do you project yourself to a particular company you like to be employed. would they be able to notice you based on your projection?

    i suggest take the course that you love to be in. as what "hgmjr" quoted "if you love your job you will never work a day in your life"

    moz
     
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