1. danish raza

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 10, 2011
    15
    0
    hy every one,
    i had made an inverter the problem is that at the output of transformer the voltage is 160 to 170v but i required 220v..i want to stepp up from 12 v to 220v using center tapped transformer but it does not happening i am receiving only 160 to 170 v kindly guide me and i am using the battery of 12v and 9A?
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Hard to know what to suggest without a schematic.
     
  3. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
    737
    150
    But likely the transformer turns ratio needs to be higher. Beenthere's suggestion is important.
     
  4. danish raza

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 10, 2011
    15
    0
  5. iONic

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 16, 2007
    1,420
    68
    Is the turns ratio of your actual transformer the same as that in the schematic?
    10-0-10???

    And what are you measuring the output voltage with? ...scope, multimeter on AC???

    And what is the frequency of the pulse from the PIC to the gate? ...50Hz, 60Hz, did you measure this?
     
  6. danish raza

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 10, 2011
    15
    0
    frequency is approximately 50hz.i am measuring through multimeter
     
  7. iONic

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 16, 2007
    1,420
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    Is the turns ratio of your actual transformer the same as that in the schematic?
    10-0-10???

    Is the multimeter set on DC or AC???
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    "help!" for a subject line does not say anything about what you are trying to do; this poor choice for a subject line will limit your responses.

    500 Watts at 220V is 2.273 Amperes at 220v, and if the inverter is ~85% efficient, 49 Amperes at 12v. The MOSFETs are only rated for 50 Amperes, so they are not adequate for the design's claims; if you used the specified MOSFETs, they would require VERY large heat sinks.

    A 9AH battery would not last long at all with a 500W load; maybe a few minutes if you are lucky.

    You cannot "breadboard" this circuit; there is just too much power involved, especially on the primary side of the transformer.

    You would be much better off to simply purchase a commercially built power inverter. "Modified sine wave" inverters are not suitable for anything but resistive loads (such as lamps, heaters, etc) which is really a waste of battery power. You would be much better off to use LED lighting in case your mains power goes off.
     
  9. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    The primary is supposed to be 10v-0v-10v, and the secondary 240v-0v-240v.

    Another fault of this inverter design is that there is no regulation on the secondary side.
     
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