Help with the identification of this SMD component

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Juanolo, Aug 22, 2014.

  1. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Hello:

    I need to repair a PCB. The component i want to replace is the one of the attached image.

    I think i found the reference for CU06 m43 as a rectifier of 600V. But i think it is not correct.

    In the datasheets i found the CU06 as a abrv. of CMR1U-06M but i did not find anything related with the number 43. can you identify it?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Can you give me any advice of how to repare the pcb line? (photo 2)

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    It is a diode. Try the SMD version of 1N4004

    The track can be replaced with a solder jump and just old single strand copper wire. No biggie.
     
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  3. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Thanks a lot for the info! where can i find a true information of SMD identification?

    can you explain me how you identified it? with the number of the top is very difficult to find information about the component...

    Thanks a lot!
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    Have a look on this page:
    http://chip.tomsk.ru/chip/chipdoc.nsf/vc1!readform&view=smd&cat=c&start=5701&count=50

    There this is stated:

    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1.  
    2. CU04     CMR1U-04        SMB         ULTRA FAST RECOVERY SILICON RECTIFIER 1 AMP
    3. CU04F   CMMR1U-04       SOD-123F    ULTRA FAST RECOVERY SILICON RECTIFIER 1 AMP
    4. CU04M   CMR1U-04M       SMA      ULTRA FAST RECOVERY SILICON RECTIFIER 1 AMP
    5.  
    Bertus
     
  5. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Thanks for the answer.. thus is a rectifier and not a 1n4004 diode? if i not find anything similar, can i replace it for other of different manufacturer or different charasteristics?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
  6. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
  7. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    The problem was an high voltage shock.

    Is the power supply of a DLP projector. I can do a photo of the board.

    in view, the only two components which were burned are this diode with the damaged pc line and the fuse.

    The diode there is a CMR1U-04M.... Which i think is CU4, in this case i need to buy the CMR1U-06M?

    Thanks
     
  8. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    It looks like the only difference between the one with and without the M extention in the type of housing.
    I think you will need the one with the M, the M is on the second line, before the mentioned 43.

    Bertus
     
    Juanolo likes this.
  9. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Going on previous experience, an 06 could indicate a 60V rating - that would possibly suggest a Shottky barrier type.

    Finding an identical device elsewhere on the board would solve your problem, borrow it to measure - SB diodes have lower than normal Vf of as low as 0.2V, they also show a little bit of reverse leakage - which would absolutely not be OK on a regular silicon type.
     
  10. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Thanks, sorry if i do not explained well before. I referred to:

    The burned component is CU6 M 43 which it match with CMR1U-06M (fast response rectifier 600V.

    The one you listed me is the CMRU-04M (fast response rectifier 400V)

    Does it matter which i select? I supose i need to select the 600V one?

    What is de difference between SMA AND SMB packaging.?

    Thanks bertus for the help!
     
  11. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If its rated 600V - don't use the 1N4007 as suggested elsewhere, it won't be anywhere near fast enough to replace an ultra fast rectifier - The UF4007 is allegedly "Ultra Fast" but they've been on the market a long time, the definition of ultra fast may have moved on since then.
     
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  12. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    1n4937. :)
     
  13. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    The 1N4004 was just for reference.
    My Mistake.

    Regarding post #10
    A 400V diode might suffice depending on the circuit used.
    If U can tell us a bit more about where the diode goes we can make sure if the replacement will work or not.
     
  14. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Even that might not be quick enough to replace a modern "ultra fast" rectifier.

    The 4937 probably dates back even further than the UF400x series.
     
  15. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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  16. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    There's always silicon-carbide rectifiers, just as fast as Shottky-barrier and ratings of 1000V+ are easy peasy - but horrendous Vf drop!
     
  17. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Hello!
    Thanks a lot for all the answers

    I uploaded some images of the whole circuit and the damaged part.

    You think only changing the cmr1u-06 it will run? what you recommend me to repair the circuit?

    20140831213049.jpg

    20140831213034.jpg

    Is the power supply of a DLP projector, i could not get the service manual because the projector is old (6 years).

    Thanks a lot for the help!
     
  18. ISB123

    Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    wrong topic sorry.
     
  19. Juanolo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2014
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    Hello, after the SMD is identified one user ask me about where the diode goes (i quote it in my last post) and i attach the photo. Can any admin move the post in the correct section?

    thanks a lot
     
  20. ISB123

    Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    Turn the pcb around and follow the trace.
     
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