help with handwound transformer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by lokeycmos, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
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    im in process of building this ESR meter : http://ludens.cl/Electron/esr/esr.html

    i have some questions about the transformer. it is a 400:20 ratio. he specifies that he is using a EA-77-188 core. i attached a pic of the cores that i have available in my parts bins. the smallest wire i have in my arsenal is 22 guage with plastic insulation. is the core type critical? could i use one in the pic? as far as turn ratio could i do something smaller like 200:10 or even 40:2 so i can fit my wire on the core ??

    thank you!
     
  2. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
    4,173
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    It would be helpfull in estimating sizes if a scale of some sort is included with picture. Look for smaller gauge magnet wire.
     
  3. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
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    hope this helps
     
  4. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
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    Since it's the ratio that matters, I'd bet you'd be OK using fewer turns and keeping the needed ratio. It's easy to try. As suggested, you can also use magnet wire (try e.g. All Electronics).
     
  5. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
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    one concern i have with going with smaller turns and the same ratio is that with less turns there is less impedance on the primary. would this cause more loading or am i totally wrong?
     
  6. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    Yes, the inductance would be less, and remember that if a coil is wound with N turns the inductance varies as N squared, not just N. You could get away with rather fewer turns if you could get hold of a core with a higher specific inductance (Al) value: L=N^{2}*Al

    The Amidon EA-77-188 has Al=1060nH, so a 200 turn winding would come out at 200*200*1060nH or 42.4mH

    https://www.amidoncorp.com/specs/2-40.pdf
     
  7. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
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    good info. is there a way to tell the AL of a core without a specsheet? right now im pulling small transformers out of SMPS's and using inductance meter to find ratio =sqr(priL/secL) hoping to get lucky and avoid winding that many turns. just for the record if i end up winding my own, could i use a ferrite rod from am radio?
     
  8. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    You would need to wind a test coil on to the core, and then get hold of some means of measuring inductance. One way might be to make the coil into a resonant circuit with a capacitor, and then measure the resonant frequency. This would require access to some test equipment.

    It would be difficult to get 40mH out of a ferrite antenna bar without winding loads of turns: even a long-wave antenna coil would only be something like 3mH.

    Also, this kind of open core would only give somewhat loose coupling between primary and secondary, but would tend to cause all kinds of stray couplings to other things - after all it's specifically designed for that.
     
  9. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
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    184
    Looking at the constructors unit & how its described I would be going for a simmilar E core ferrite T/F. Heres a pic of a few ive salvaged from various powersupplys for re use, some have an air gap which he doesnt recomend. in the pics the top 2 dont have an air gap & probably would be quite suitable. One way of dismantling these T/Fs is soak in paint stripper for 24Hrs, be prepared to crack the cores on some this way. The other way is cook them in a Microwave oven for a minute or 2 this is how i do it & works well. Warning dont use a good oven as its hard on the Magnetron I use an old oven that i picked up for free. I have used salvaged cores like these & rewound them for various low voltage SMPS projects quite succesfuly.
     
  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I don't know how anyone would get that meter to work, as the TL06x, 7x, and 8x series can't "see" within 1.5v of +v or within 3v of -v. Since the supply is only 5v, that leaves 0.5v for the usable I/O range - however, they've biased the inputs at Vcc/2, so that's 2.5v - out of the common mode range.

    The circuit is using an opamp out of its' specified operating range.
     
  11. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
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    could you elaborate on that? are you saying it wont work? this is rather disappointing. i spent a lot of time unsoldering parts from junk circuit boards.
     
  12. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    If you look at the datasheets for the TL06x series, you will see that the common mode range is from -v + 3v to +v -1.5v. So, if your supply voltage is 5v, you only have 3v to 3.5v as the entire input and output range.

    That family of opamps was intended for use with dual rail supplies.

    But, the way they used the 100k resistors to bias the opamp inputs at Vcc/2 will work if a single supply is high enough in voltage. If it doesn't work with a single 5v supply, try increasing the supply voltage to 10v.
     
  13. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
    432
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    transformer update! i was going through my box of computer power supplies unsoldering transformers. i came across one and with using my inductance meter and the formula sqr(priL/secL) it has a 18.588:1 ratio. when compared to the 400:20 in the schematic it is 371.75:20 this is where i need the experts opinion on whether it would be a good substitute.
     
  14. billbehen

    Active Member

    May 10, 2006
    39
    1
    Depends on the application! Is this a power supply or other power circuit, or an RF circuit, or audio isolation? Wire size/length determine DC resistance & thus power handling capability. Fewer turns or lower perm core tanslates to lower impedance, but how much you need depends on what its hooked up to....

    Check the DC winding resistance and calculate I^2 * R to see if will handle the current!
     
  15. lokeycmos

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 3, 2009
    432
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    application is the 1st post on page 1 of this tread
     
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