Help with electrical engineering topics

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by eldadoh, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. eldadoh

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 2, 2014
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    0
    hello,
    I just finished my first year , and I want to expand my knowledge in the domain of
    electrical engineering , can you recommend me about an interesting subjects that I can start learn alone ?
    I really want to start experience and explore new areas so thanks for the help .
     
  2. MrAl

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    2,438
    492
    Hi,

    Not sure what you've had yet because curriculums vary quite a bit.

    Just to start off:
    Nodal analysis.
    Laplace Transforms.
     
  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,771
    970
    "interesting" is in the eye of the beholder..
    Is there a specific section of EE that you enjoy or are interested in?
    Would you like physical projects or book recommendations or what?
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,145
    1,791
    For starters I would climb on the interwebs and track down component datasheets. Then read them and become familiar with the terminology and be able to grok what the datasheet is telling you. Do this and you will be head and shoulders above your contemporaries.
     
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  5. eldadoh

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 2, 2014
    23
    0
    ok , nice idea , from where should I Start?


    I am interesting in the integration of computers and electricity, I saw on higher courses the VLSI language, should I start reading guides about it ?
    or MATLAB ?
    and if you think there is a book that EE must read , can you right me it name?

    :)
     
  6. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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  7. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    You must learn to walk before you run.. VLSI as you have said is a "higher level" course..
    I doubt you are there yet after just your first year?
    Can you even construct basic electronic circuits?
     
  8. eldadoh

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 2, 2014
    23
    0
    yes , basic ones.
    I want to start doing things alone, to learn alone from guides on web or E-books and then to implement those things .
    I am sure there is a difference between what I am learning on my EE degree and what really happens after graduation when you are looking for a job, I want to reduce this gap and if I can as fast as possible.
     
  9. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,145
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    Since it is not possible to absorb all the knowledge about components in your coursework you must acquire this on your own. When you find a project online, in a book, or magazine your first challenge is to acquire the parts. The datasheet not only tells you about the part it also gives you the information you need to correctly order it. A long time ago there were retail stores where you could go to purchase components. They're all gone now, and all components are ordered online.

    Also, don't neglect passive components like resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

    A great resource for component information
    www.digikey.com
     
  10. OneMoreThing

    New Member

    Nov 10, 2014
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  11. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,751
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    Here's a couple suggestions:

    For working with hardware, go to Digilent (http://www.digilentinc.com/) and check out the various kits they have. Of particular might be the Analog Discovery kit (and the optional parts kit, which is a REAL bargain). You might also look at the various development boards they have for FPGAs and other programmable logic. Get one or two of the real cheap ones at first so that you don't have to be too paranoid about doing something that destroys it (always a learning opportunity, by the way).

    A really good project to learn a lot about computer hardware and software is the Nand2Tetris project, which is done entirely in emulation on a computer so no hardware cost at all. The software tools are free and the text is only about $30 new. An overview of it is in my blog: http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/blog/nand2tetris-overview.590/

    You might also look at places like Ramsey Electronics for small, cheap kits that you can build to learn about a variety of things.

    After getting your feet wet with this type of stuff, you will be better prepared to start thinking of things that you want to do for your own interests. Another way to get experience is to join the IEEE or robotics or other student groups that your school might have and get involved with their goings-on, even if that might mean you taking the lead to make some of those things go on. One thing that I did that I learned a lot from was to do a couple simple projects for other student organizations. The theatre group needed some prop work done such as being able to ring a telephone on stage and to dim some on-stage torche lamps. I didn't know how to do either of those things, so I spent a few hours of spare time finding out (this was in 1987 so before the internet) such as calling up the phone company and talking to one of their engineers.
     
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