Help with component placement?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by SublimeOrangeUK, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. SublimeOrangeUK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2013
    4
    0
    Hi there,

    I'm trying to make a "Remote control signal jammer" but I'm confused on where I should place and solder the components on a piece of copper stripboard.

    The piece I have when the strips are horizontal is 12 holes vertical by 50 holes horizontal.

    The schematics are this: http://www.next.gr/uploads/543-968ed73dfd.gif

    Any help would be greatly appreciated :)

    Regards,

    -SublimeOrangeUK
     
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
    675
    so long as you make the connections given in your image, you shouldn't have any problem. You don't need to be choosy about placement with something like this...
     
  3. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    Have you used a stripboard before? Do you know the basics about placing components so that they make use of the separate electrical strips, and that some strips will have to be cut to accommodate your circuit? Or are you just asking if the components have to be in some particular relation to each other?
     
  4. JMac3108

    Active Member

    Aug 16, 2010
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    Don't forget to include a bypass cap. I don't see it on the schematic. You need a bypass cap between VCC and GND (pins 8 and 1). Place it right next to the pins on the device, as close as possible. A 0.1uf ceramic should do just fine.
     
  5. SublimeOrangeUK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2013
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    No, I fully understand how a stripboard works but I'm asking if someone could draw a diagram or something of where to put each component on a stripboard in order for it to work

    Cheers
     
  6. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    There are no layout restraints with one exception. The .1 μF capacitor that was recommended by JMac3108 should be placed across pins 1 and 8 of the 555 as close as possible to the pins. As tshuck already said, just place the components in the most convenient location for correct electrical connection. Of course, you want the LEDs located where you can point them at the target, and you want the pot where it is accessible.

    Unless you are contrained for space, just mount the 555 in the center of the stripboard and then arrange the other components around it.

    I always print a copy of my schematic, and highlight each component and connection on the paper as I add it to the assembly.
     
  7. SublimeOrangeUK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2013
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    Is the cap across 1 and 8 necessary?
     
  8. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    The capacitor on the power pins of the IC will have an effect on the stability of the circuit.
    Read this thread for more information:
    Decoupling or Bypass Capacitors, Why?

    Bertus
     
  9. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    A lot of circuits are assembled without it and work, but it should be there. If you don't have one now, leave room for it and add it later.
     
  10. JMac3108

    Active Member

    Aug 16, 2010
    349
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    If you leave out the bypass cap there's a good chance you'll be posting on here asking why your circuit is acting strangely sometimes :D

    Good design practice is to ALWAYS include bypass capacitance. Why not include it? The cost is negligible.
     
  11. SublimeOrangeUK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2013
    4
    0
    Hi guys, thank you for all your help but literally all I'm asking, since im a bit of a noob, is a drawing/picture of where I should put each compnent on a copper stripboard

    Thanks
     
  12. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,440
    3,361
    Place the components where ever you please.

    It would be helpful for you to make a sketch on a piece of paper showing the layout of your components. This way you can move them around before you begin soldering.

    I would put the resistors and capacitors close to where they connect to a specific pin on the IC.

    I like to reserve two rails for power and ground. Sometimes it makes life easier if I put a pair of PWR and GND above the IC (above pins 1 and 8) and another pair below the IC (below pins 4 and 5).

    Then I run a solid wire to connect the two PWR rails and a second solid wire to connect the two GND rails. Then it is easy to solder a 0.1μF filter capacitor and a 10μF electrolytic capacitor.

    There must be a thousand ways to layout a 555 timer circuit. Here is just one of them:


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  13. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
    5,939
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    Some off topic. But I like to use a 3.5 mm HSS drill bit to cut trace in a clean way. If you get a new and sharp one. You can just use some light pressure, and your fingers to turn it
     
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