Help with Commercial oven question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by lionheartbread, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. lionheartbread

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2012
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    Hello,

    I am attaching a schematic of an oven I am considering purchasing. it is a 3 phase oven and I would like to have any opinion as to the problems that might be encountered in trying to convert the oven to 240V single phase. Or if this is even a worthwhile idea. I do have an electrician friend who could do the work for me.

    The wiring is 12AWG and 14AWG to the elements as noted on the schematic. I understand that I would have to at least switch out the 12AWG wiring.

    Any and all comments welcome.

    Thanks.

    BTW This is my first post.

    Howard
    Lionheart Baking Studio
    Warkworth, ON Canada
     
  2. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
    348
    58
    I am not sure how those "Power control" modules work. Apart from that I can't see any problem except you will have a bit of rewiring to do.

    The "Service line" will be staying exactly as is and you will need a separate 115V 60HZ supply
     
  3. lionheartbread

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2012
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    Thanks.

    The power control modules allow you to regulate the amount of heat to the upper, lower, and front elements.
     
  4. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
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    Yes I know that - they are common to every cooker I have ever used , but how are they controlled?
    Is there electronics in them or are they of the older "simmerstat" type with bimetallic strip and a heater coil.
     
  5. lionheartbread

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2012
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    Sorry, I am not that knowledgable. I will try and find out from the manufacturer. I assume by your question that it could be an issue.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  6. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
    1,513
    193
    When you say "convert the oven to 240V single phase", do mean attempt to feed the oven only 240V single phase? If yes, I'd highly advise against it. Talk to the manufacturer and see if you can talk to tech support or similar. They will probably tell you no too, but maybe not.

    If you want to use a 3-phase appliance where only single-phase power is available, look for a phase converter:

    http://www.phase-a-matic.com/

    http://www.phoenixphaseconverters.com/

    These usually aren't the cleanest power and are often used for 3-phase motors on machining equipment being used in a house. Not sure how clean the power needs to be for an oven, but you can talk with the phase converter manufacturers to be safe.
     
  7. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
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    Why would he want a phase converter? His load is 100% resistive.
     
  8. lionheartbread

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2012
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    The main problem I foresee is the need for larger gauge wire due to a higher current, with a larger fuse size of course, and, as has been pointed out, perhaps some issue with the power controller. I intend to take the steam generator out of the circuit as I do not need it. This brings the total wattage to 6Kw, which is less than many home ovens.

    Phase converters are not the way to go for resistive loads in anycase as they are way too expensive. I did use a static phase converter once for a 3 phase motor in a large dough mixer.
     
  9. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
    348
    58
    6KW shouldn't be a problem, most electric showers are of the order of 8-9KW.
    Just ensure you use adequately sized heatproof wire inside the cooker.

    You also need to check how those "control modules" work.
     
  10. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
    1,513
    193
    This is a good point but why use a three-phase appliance in a location that can only supply single-phase? I assume this isn't a cheap appliance but irregardless, the OP is talking about using different line power than what the unit was designed for. If we were talking about hacking a toy powered by batteries, sure, let's look at the schematic and make it do something it wasn't made for. If something goes wrong, who cares? But an oven? If something goes wrong, the oven could be destroyed or worse, someone could get hurt. I'm not an electrician or a manufacturer of ovens, so if they tell you otherwise, go for it. If not, I wouldn't try this.

    Larger wire and breaker, certainly, but, again, please talk to a licensed electrician and/or the manufacturer before attempting this. Is there a reason to go with a 3-phase oven over a single-phase one or are they not made? I'm not trying to be a naysayer, I just want you to be safe and 100% positive this will work. This forum is primarily made up of people working with basic to intermediate DC electronics, not AC appliances. The only people who could safely and correctly tell you how to do this are the manufacturer or an electrician. However, if you don't talk to the manufacturer and something goes wrong, they probably will not honor any warranties.
     
  11. lionheartbread

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 21, 2012
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    Thank you for your concern about my safety. The oven I am looking to purchase is used, so no warranty there. Yes, it was designed for three phase, but it has most of the characteristics I am looking for, and that are not all present in a readily available single phase oven.

    I do not plan to do any of this work myself and have spoken to a friend who has been an electrician, indeed a community college instructor, for over 30 years. He felt that there would be no great issues, but suggested disconnecting the water heater, which is not a problem for me.

    I was just looking for further input as many eyes, and minds are better.

    Thanks to everyone, this is a really great forum!
     
  12. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
    1,513
    193
    Ah, okay. We just want you to be safe and I daresay most of us on this forum do not have the background or qualifications to safely recommend doing this, including myself. Sounds like you're in good hands though.

    Please don't hesitate to post other electronics questions in the future if you have any. We love to help one another here. Good luck.
     
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