Help with cctv camera

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rajbps, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    I recently got a ptz camera with a power adaptor.

    Now on the power adaptor it says : input: 100 ~ 240v AV 50/60Hz 0.3A

    Output : 12V 1000mA.

    If i connect the adaptor directly to the camera it works well.

    I cut the adaptor cable to extent it and the camera just would not do anything.
    There is 12V coming.

    Can anyone assist me pls.

    i am new.

    Cheers,

    Raj
     
  2. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
    2,810
    834
    Did you accidentally reverse the connections (I.e., the polarity?)?
     
  3. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    nope i checked that and polarity is good seens to be if i add the ext cable i have this issue.
    Cable being used is cat5 2 stran of it:-(
     
  4. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
    1,146
    204
    How long is the wires? What guage?

    What is the vltage at the camera?

    Powerstream has a nice voltage drop calculator: http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

    If you double up the wires, the the drop will be 1/2.
     
  5. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
    1,146
    204
    How long is the wires? What guage?

    What is the voltage at the camera?

    Powerstream has a nice voltage drop calculator: http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

    If you double up the wires, the the drop will be 1/2.
     
  6. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Cat 5 wire is pretty small. Try thicker wire. It should be at least as thick as the adapter cord.
     
  7. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    Hi guys,

    The cat 5 wire looks the same size of the adaptor.

    I done a video to show the problem.

    I upload it shortly and maybe that could shed some more light on things but again thanks for the help.

    Cheers,

    Raj
     
  8. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
    1,146
    204
    Measure the voltage AT THE CAMERA please!
     
  9. dmshropshire

    Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    Use stranded wire. Speaker wire or something close.
     
  10. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    I have tried speaker wires with same results and I do get 12v on the end by the cam :-(

    Still trying to fine a site to upload the video :-(
     
  11. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,542
    1,251
    CAT-5 cable may be the same size as the cable from the power adapter, but CAT-5 cable has 8 wires in it and the power cable has only two. Use 18 AWG lamp cord. Also, make sure you are measuring the voltage at the end of the cable when it is connect to the camera. It will read a perfect 12 V with no load, but that doesn't tell us anything.

    And re-re-re-recheck the polarity. Every single seasoned, experienced, professional expert on this forum has made the mistake at least once.

    ak
     
    djsfantasi likes this.
  12. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    Hiya,

    I tried with speaker cables and def the polarity is been checked and rechecked.

    Now the voltage does drop to 10..something.

    Any ideas on how to stop this from happening?

    Cheers,

    raj
     
  13. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
    2,810
    834
    Did you ever answer how long the extension cables were? There is always a voltage drop over a length if cable. How much is dependent on the length of the cable and the resistance per unit of distance of the cable. Note that smaller (in terms of cross sectional size, not AWG number) wire gauges will have a greater voltage drop. The first thing you can do is use thicker wire. If that is not enough, then you have to supply a higher voltage to compensate for the voltage drop. I've seen a 16VDC supply with a local 12VDC regulator used.
     
  14. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Voltage drop will be the product of overall resistance and current drawn by your camera. Assuming your camera draws 1000mA and resistance is 2 ohm, then you have 2v drop in your wire. Resistance can come from the wire or the connections. Check each with an ohm-meter if you have one. If not, check that you connections are tight and your wire is thick, the thicker the better. Other than that, there is nothing you can do, except try to put more voltage in the end of the wire. That could be risky though.
     
  15. BReeves

    Member

    Nov 24, 2012
    412
    64
    Also depending on the camera, running it at a lower voltage can damage the DC-DC converter if it has one. Been there, had tech do that that should have known better. This was a $4000.00 sony camera.

    You really need to tell us how long the extension is....
     
  16. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
  17. dmshropshire

    Member

    Dec 1, 2013
    33
    6
    What is the make and model of the camera? Does it still work at a short distance?
     
  18. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    Its a wanscan:

    Here is the power requirements:

    Power Supply DC 12V, 1A

    Have not tried short distance but will try and post an update.

    Cheers,

    Raj
     
  19. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    ok i tried to measure the amps and this is what i get as per picture
     
    • ac1.jpg
      ac1.jpg
      File size:
      294 KB
      Views:
      26
    • ac2.jpg
      ac2.jpg
      File size:
      296.1 KB
      Views:
      26
  20. rajbps

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    9
    0
    Might be on something.

    reduced the cable length and now if i turn the cam manually while applying power sometimes it comes up.

    But if left without any help, still does not :-(
     
Loading...