Help with a rotating circuit

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Arian675, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    Hello all,

    My knowledge of electronics does not exceed beyond P = V I and light switches. however im working on a mechanical based project that includes a tiny electronic circuit to be built.

    I visited a local electronics shop but the shop owner refused to give me "free lessons" and asked me to google the parts I need before going back.

    long story short:

    I need a electronic motor with a diameter of less than 4 cm to rotate clockwise and counter clockwise via a switch. Itd be nice to control the speed of rotation on both directions. ultimately the rotating motor is supposed to turn a metal rod thatd be connected to it.

    If anyone can tell me what parts do I need to purchase and how to assemble such a circuit, it would be very helpful.

    PS: If you decide to help, please do with details as I don't know anything about electronics.

    thnx
     
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
    675
    I'm not sure how detailed you are asking for, but provided your motor is a brushed DC motor, an H-bridge will allow for reversible directions from a single supply(battery). A 555 can be used to generate a Pulse-Width Modulated(PWM) control signal to control the speed of the motor, and a potentiometer can be used to set the pulse-width of the PWM signal so as to set the speed. A DPST switch can be used to set the direction of the motor...
     
  3. GRNDPNDR

    Member

    Mar 1, 2012
    435
    7
    sounds like your local electronics guy is a bit of a d-bag and likely doesn't even know jack about electronics, which is why he told you to google and find out what parts you need because he couldn't assemble them anyway.
    I'd tell him you're googling and then going to give your business to another company.

    Need more info though what voltage are the motors running at, what will they actually be doing?
     
  4. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
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    I think that's an unfair assumption. If his local electronics store is anything like mine, it's one guy behind a counter who is responsible for large arrays of ICs and various components. If there are other people that could need help, it doesn't make sense to sit and explain the theory of electronics to someone, from a business point of view.
     
  5. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    @tshuck: seems like you have provided me with the info I needed...thanks man

    @GRNDPNDR: picture this : O-----

    "O" being the motor
    "------" being the metal rod
    essentially the motor should rotate the rod
    that's connected to it clockwise and counter clockwise
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    6,852
    The size or weight of the metal rod would be helpful.
    Tiny DC motors usually spin really fast. Several thousand RPM is a common speed. Is that your goal?
    Well, of course you want to adjust to low speeds, but how fast is "fast" to you?
     
  7. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    -metal rod would be 7 inches long with a diameter of 1 inch weighing 0.5-1 pound

    -speed range that im looking for would be SUPER SLOW to SLOW
     
  8. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
    675
    You will probably need a gearbox for your motor to provide enough torque to turn the rod, though we don't know anything about your motor...
     
  9. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    seems like I don't know enough to even ask a question lol...anyways ill go ahead with the instructions u gave me
     
  10. John P

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 14, 2008
    1,634
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    You can go to a hobby store and buy the kind of controller that's made for model trains. They typically run a motor of just the size that you've talking about, in both directions. If a speed control knob and a direction switch is all you need, that would do the whole job for you.
     
    #12 likes this.
  11. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
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    That's why you're here, right?:)

    You have a bit more considerations before you can just go ahead....

    Do you have any information on your motor?
     
  12. GRNDPNDR

    Member

    Mar 1, 2012
    435
    7
    Maybe it's just me then, but we have only 2 electronics suppliers here where you can buy all the components you need.

    Both places are exactly as you say, one guy behind the counter, but each store has a couple of employees.

    They are always willing to help out as much as possible and have decent knowledge of electronics.

    so yeah from my POV it seems like a dbag move to say "no free lessons, google what you need then come back"

    I for one, would not return to such a store.
     
  13. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I think OP wants us to choose a motor.
     
  14. GRNDPNDR

    Member

    Mar 1, 2012
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    it's going to take a helluva motor to turn a rod that weighs 1lb unless that rod is mounted to the motor in the middle of the rod.
     
  15. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Ah yes... that seems to be the case...

    @OP,then what kind of voltage/current have we to work with?
     
  16. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    thanks for the suggestions guys.....I was thinking of a motor that would run with a chargeable battery like the ones inside shavers...is that possible?
     
  17. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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  18. GRNDPNDR

    Member

    Mar 1, 2012
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    OOOOHHHHHHHHH that's how you want to rotate the rod.

    The rod is mounted axially to the shaft of the motor, or along the axis of the motor shaft.

    In that case it won't take much motor to turn it, but it's going to take support at both ends to not bend the motor shaft, but I'm sure you already knew that.

    what kind of shaver?? like electric hair clipper things? those motors vibrate, they aren't motors as far as I know.

    Why not use the motor from one of those small electric screw drivers. they should be about the right size, turn slowly and have plenty of torque. plus it would come with speed adjustment as well as a reversal switch and run from a battery.
     
  19. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
    4,176
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    The Electronic Goldmine has several motors that might work, G 17949, & G18120 under 4 cm dia with heafty output shafts. Believe shaver, old one, used 5 AA Ni-Cd's for 6 V, +-. If you have a charger might go for Ni-Mh giving roughly 2 to 3 hours run time. RPM is much more understandable than verry slow. Is there any load on the rod? Not part of a wench?
     
  20. Arian675

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 4, 2013
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    @GRNDPNDR:GREAT call on the screwdriver...I don't know why didn't think of it

    @Bernard: there wont be a significant load on the rod and thanks for motor suggestions

    THANK YOU ALL.....got all the info needed...time to go back to the electronic shop lol
    great experience here.....great forum...cheers
     
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