Help with 277 volt LED track lighting

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by RUNnor22, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. RUNnor22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2007
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    I recently got a 277 volt LED track lighting set and we are trying to figure out how to power it up. It had a three prong lock-in end to it that I didn't understand so we tried to change it to a normal one and plug it in to a socket at home. Just as we thought, it did not work. I was told by someone that we need a transformer or something but I don't know. If anyone can help that would be great!
     
  2. Newton1Law

    Member

    Aug 22, 2007
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    I am not familiar with the 277 volt LED track lighting set you are speaking of but I would think that they came with some instructions to help you. If they are 277 volt fixtures, then it is likely that you need to supply 277 volts to them in order for the LEDs to light. Also, you said the plug that came on it was a three prong lock-in unit. This would mean they expected you to plug it into a receptacle that is also designed to operate at 277 volts.

    Perhaps I could help you further if you could supply more information on the light fixtures. Who makes them? Is there a model number?
     
  3. RUNnor22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2007
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    thanks for the reply! the deal is that they were a demo or model track lighting fixture and they were not purchased with any packaging or instructions. I am guessing you are right about providing it with 277 volts, but I was wondering if you knew how we can do that. If you have any specific questions that would help about the light please ask, but like i said there is no information on the lights.
     
  4. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,373
    1,157
    Do you know the model number of the track lighting? The manufacturer?

    You might find the instructions you need online, certainly the manufacturer would have an electronic copy.
     
  5. techroomt

    Senior Member

    May 19, 2004
    198
    1
    the abstract here is high voltage source (277vac) and low voltage load (led). but, the 277 vac i am familiar with is 277 volts to neutral. and if 2 phases of 277 vac are measured one to another, you'll read 480 vac, hence 277/480 3 phase considered light-industrial voltage. but here i am suspecting you are just using one phase to neutral. so, how do you get 277 vac at home? you will need a step up transformer. you can step up from 120 vac to 277 vac, or from 208 vac to 277 vac. and of course you will need one that will handle the required current of your load. are there any markings on this device? how did you know it was 277 vac?
     
  6. RUNnor22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 22, 2007
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    I got it from a friend who worked at a lighting company I think. He told me that they gave it to him because it was just like a demo model or something. There is no information on it other than it say on the cord that it is 300w. My friend also told me that they plugged it into a transformer and it worked and that the guy told him that it required 277 volts. How do I go about getting a transformer and stepping it up to 277 or whatever.

    thanks
     
  7. wireaddict

    Senior Member

    Nov 1, 2006
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    One possible suggestion: open it up where the power cord connects to the lamp assembly; there is probably a power transformer. See if it possibly has several taps for different operating voltages [some mercury vapor & high pressure sodium fixtures have marked taps like this]. If so, use the leads for the voltage you have.

    Another idea that just occurred to me is to see if this transformer has the output or secondary voltage shown on it. If so, replace it with a 275-300VA unit with the primary voltage you need & the same secondary voltage.
     
  8. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
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    I think that is a very good idea.
    If possible replace the transformer with a same power and primary voltage that equals your mains supply and same secondary voltage as before.
     
  9. Newton1Law

    Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    10
    0
    A possible test to see if the LEDs light at all on an AC input would be to just use the 240 volt supply you have in your home already. If the LEDs at least glow, you will know that you are on the right track.

    A possible solution for the to get the 277 volt supply would be to use a McMaster Carr part number 70525K71 power transformer and connect it as an auto-transformer. If you want to try this let me know and I'll send you the appropriate diagram.
     
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