Help Please!

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by pete schnekter, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. pete schnekter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2014
    3
    0
    Hello All,

    I'm new to this Forum and I apologise in advance for being completely and utterly clueless about anything to do with electricity. Some folks have a gift in this area, but for some reason my gift is to unwittingly blow up things which plug into the mains.

    So with this in mind, here is my problem which I hope someone will be able to help me with (apart from the obvious advice to just go and buy a new part:D).

    I have an oldish heater in my lounge which has two heat settings and also has a very realistic flame-effect. This effect is set behind a sheet of glass and is created very simply by an airdraft from a horozontally-mounted 'tube' type fan which blows onto thin, dark red material, which is cut vertically into strips of about 20mm wide. As the strips move, light from below is allowed to shine through the cloth at random intervals and this gives the effect of the red-backlighted real (but not alight, of course) coals giving off small flames.

    The problem is that there was a vibration from somewhere around the fan and as I was trying to find the source, I inadvertantly pressed a screwdriver onto the winding which surrounds the brushless motor. I know. No need to say it.

    There was a popping sound and a small flame from the cloth-type covering of the winding and naturally, the whole thing came to a smelly halt.

    After this, I checked all the fuses (I can actually do this successfully, amazingly, using an ohm-meter) and despite them all being sound the whole motor/heating unit combo is now apparently kaput.

    I need to know, provided I can find where the winding has broken, is it possible to repair it and if so, how? Is this winding a kind of transformer or is it part of the motor?

    If it's any help, here are details from the two labels on the motor unit:

    FERGAS, Linkoping, Sweden 50522 96.12.12 566

    and, in very small lettering, adjacent to the winding: L48-12-007 24v 50Hz c.ass H K1147 4996

    I hope I'll be able to rescue this thing. The family has grown very fond of it over the years and my wife is very cross indeed. Things will not be good if I don't get the fake flames back again very soon.:eek:

    Many thanks,
    Pete.
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,507
    2,367
    You may have damaged the motor, but the whole thing should not be 'Kaput' , the heater should still be working, so it sounds as though there is no power anywhere?
    If you have a voltmeter, check the power close as possible to the entry point.
    If the heaters are working, then you may need a replacement fan motor.
    Most of these motors are available from a local motor dealer/rewinder.
    Max.
     
  3. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    I once repaired a ceiling fan by mending a motor winding. But, I was VERY lucky that winding was in the very first layer, and I didn't have to unwind any of the wire to find it. Unless you are just as lucky, your motor is not repairable. Small fans are cheap and pleantiful
     
  4. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
    4,670
    804
    Well, first of all we need some photos to get our heads around the problem.

    So if I understand you correctly, the motor you described is just for the "burning effect" and is not a part of the actual heating system? Does the heating part work? Are you sure you didn´t just trip some breaker in the house?
     
  5. pete schnekter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2014
    3
    0
    Many thanks, Max, Brownout and Kubeek.

    As far as I could tell, once the little 'pop' had occurred, nothing in the unit worked at all. I tried the turning on heating elements, but no joy. The fan is indeed responsible only for the 'flame effect' and has no other use. I had a look at the house's main circuit board immediately after the incident and nothing had tripped at all, which is surprising, as normally one only has to sneeze in the direction of anything electrical in the house and off it clicks. I suspect that in order for the heating elements to work, they require the circuit from the mains via the flame effect fan to be unbroken.

    Brownout, I think the damage to the winding is right at the top of the winding and is somewhere in the most outer layer. The winding wire is so fine that I'll need to use a jeweller's loop (8 magnification) in order to find out exactly where the break is. If I do locate this break, how would I repair it?

    Thanks again all of you for taking the trouble to respond.

    Kind regards,
    Pete
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,252
    6,751
    Use a short piece of fine wire to bridge the gap and solder it in. Very picky operation. No surprise if you fail.

    ps, circuit breakers can pop and not be obvious. Check the outlet with a lamp or something. Fondle the breakers gently to find any that aren't rigidly in the "on" position.
     
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,507
    2,367
    I would be surprised if the fan was required for the heater, IF it only provides effect and not air flow over the heaters?
    Max.
     
    #12 likes this.
  8. pete schnekter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2014
    3
    0

    Many thanks #12 for your advice. I suspect that if I do try this I will be the least likely to succeed of anyone who ever posted on this Forum, but I'll probably give it a whirl anyway.:D

    Max, this is a beautifully-made and -engineered little unit - the heater elements are at the top, having their own fan blowing the warmth downwards. Very effective at warming the room quite fast, but with 2000 watts being drawn, I tend to let the house's central heating do the warming work and just let the heater look all cosy with its flickering flames above the coals. I wouldn't normally have something with a faux flame in my lounge, but this is very realistic and is truly an inspired design. I really do want to get it going again. Not least because every time my wife looks at it unworking and flameless I get that look which says 'why don't you just leave things alone?' and I have to pretend to be patting the dog or blowing my nose.:rolleyes:

    Thanks both for your responses.

    Kind regards,
    Pete.
     
  9. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,252
    6,751
    If your house furnace is electric (not gas, oil, or coal), there is no difference in efficiency.
     
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