Help! Novice has hit roadblock

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by sjb1964, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. sjb1964

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 16, 2014
    3
    0
    Hi,

    Apologies if this is the wrong forum to seek advice, but seeing as it is the most active, I went for it.

    The doorbell receiver I just bought has a bright light that stays on 100% of the time, and I'd like to disable it.

    When I removed the front and examined the circuit board (see photo), I saw that the miniature bulb -- see yellow box -- was soldered in. Is there any way to disable the bulb without leaving an open circuit and creating a risk of fire? The receiver plugs into a 110v outlet.

    Many thanks for any advice. Please be as specific as possible with your suggestions, as I'm not familiar with electronics terminology.

    Sincerely,

    Scott
     
  2. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
    1,008
    351
    Why would an open circuit create a risk of fire?

    You could put a dab of black paint on it, but I would just desolder it, or one leg of it
     
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  3. sjb1964

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 16, 2014
    3
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    Desoldering and removing it would solve the problem? If so, that's terrific, thank you.

    I know little about electronics. Just figured that if I removed the bulb without cutting off the flow of electricity, the electricity would have to go somewhere, and in this case, would just transfer heat to the unit.
     
  4. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,452
    3,371
    Just put black tape over the LED.
     
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  5. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
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    no, opeing the circuit by cutting one wire does not make the electricity leak out, or heat up stuff, only stops the flow.
     
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  6. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
    1,008
    351
    If there is no connection the electricity does not go anywhere. Think of the electrical sockets in your house, no electricity "leaks" out if there is nothing plugged in.

    Without knowing the circuit in detail there is a possibility that desoldering could have an effect but I would think that is unlikely. It's most likely that one side of the LED is just connected directly to ground or connected to ground through a resistor.
     
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  7. sjb1964

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 16, 2014
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    Thanks again, sirch2! Not sure if my attached photo of the circuit was in focus.
     
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