Help me understand this

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lightfire, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hello folks.

    Okay,

    Please look at the schematic I attached.

    As you may see there, the battery was rated as 12 volts and the lamp was rated as 6 volts. Am I correct? And the circuit has a switch in positive line of the circuit which is off. Am I right?

    So since the battery was rated as 12 volts and the lamp was rated as 6 volts, is there any possibility that the lamp will be broken even though the switch is off? I am guessing no.

    Okay, the electrons flows in the negative side, so that electrons can flows even though there is no positive line as the electrons flows in the negative side. But I am guessing I am wrong since if I were remember negative line will not produce electrons if there is no positive line. Eh, I really don't know.

    Please help me understand this.
    Any help would be appreciated.

    Your folk mate,
    Lightfire
     
  2. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    No, the lamp won't be harmed with the switch open. no current will flow until you complete the circuit by closing the switch.

    EDIT: being from the Philippines, you may refer to the switch as being "open" when the light is on - I know, my wife does (she is from the Philippines). She will say "open the light" instead of "turn on the light". This is incorrect. Just to clear up any confusion, you drew the switch in the OPEN position.
     
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  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Okay.

    Can you explain why there is no current flowing through the circuit?

    Thank you.
     
  4. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    in order for current to flow, there needs to be a conductive path from the + terminal of the battery to the - terminal. With the switch open, there is no conductive path.
     
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  5. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Okay. Thank you so much for the information you gave.:D

    Lightfire
     
  6. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    No problem.

    Just out of curiosity, if you wanted someone to turn on the lights, would you say "open the lights"? - or is just my wife?
     
  7. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Honestly, we, Filipinos, when we are about to turn on the lights, we say it in Filipino language not in English language.:DBut when I am in school, teachers says it "Turn on the lights." mostly.:pBut me, I guess, I already said the word open the light. :p :p :p:p:p

    Lightfire
     
  8. iONic

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 16, 2007
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  9. Jaguarjoe

    Active Member

    Apr 7, 2010
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    In Motown, it's "cut on the lights" and "cut the lights off". If a pipefitter working at "Ford's" or "Chrysler's" wants an electrician to energize a pump, it's "OK, cut it on!"
     
  10. n1ist

    Active Member

    Mar 8, 2009
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    "open the lights" (and even "turn on the lights") is a leftover from the days of gas lighting where you would open the valve by turning it (and then lighting it) to cause a lamp to illuminate.
    /mike
     
  11. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    Really? That's interesting, never knew that. I figured (in the case of my wife; never heard anyone else say it) it was result of meaning being lost through direct translation. In the Filipino language, they often have many meanings for the same word, whereas in english, we often have often have many words for the same meaning. "open" in tagalog is "Bukas", which also means "tomorrow" I think, and a couple of other things (I'm not too sure, I'm learning it slowly).
     
  12. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    For a more recent take on this one time two (very good actually) technicians could not figure out how to wire in a SPST switch I'd given them as it was marked (as they said) "dash" and "oh."

    I told then to turn it 90 degrees so it would read "one" and "zero;" to their credit they did not need to be told "one" was the ON position.

    ;)
     
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