Help me identify this please

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by EliteScouter, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    My rotary tool decided to die on me today and being me I opened it up to see what died =)

    I found this guy with stuff that came out of it and this is probably the problem since its opened up on the side and stuff is leaking out.

    It had a couple of numbers but it was being blocked by the wierd stuff so I thaught i would get rid of it with a soldering iron, well it got rid of the numbers too so now I have no idea what this is, what part number, where I can buy a spare.

    If it helps the rotary tool is made by All-Power America.

    Please let me know, and if you can identify it I would much appricaite it!

    Thank You



    [​IMG]
     
  2. RRITESH KAKKAR

    Senior Member

    Jun 29, 2010
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    I think it is a old coin.....
     
  3. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    Saw that coming....
     
  4. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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  5. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    Thank You! That narrows down my search so much!

    Any idea how I can identify the nF and V? I have no numbers on the side. I am not an electrician so what would happen if the nF and V didn't match the original?
     
  6. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    The voltage rating needs to be at least 400 to handle your line voltage, 600 would be better if it'll fit. The motor won't run right with the wrong capacitance. You could try some different values to see what gets a smooth run at various speeds. I'd start with something like 0.22µF (220nF). That melted polypropylene could be removed with a heat gun. Maybe some of the numbers are readable underneath.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2011
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    KJ...the pic shows an American penny. If he's in USA he's probably using 120 RMS for a hand tool. No need for 600 volt capacitors.
     
  8. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
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    Off subject... I collect coins, looking at the oddity behind Lincoln's head, it could be an error coin. Take it to a dealer, you might get $15 to $20 for it.
     
  9. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Just looks like someone tried to cut it with a pair of dikes..
     
  10. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    I know; the extra margin's not so much for the line voltage as the spikes coming back from the motor. It's already killed one (probably overrated) capacitor.

    For anyone who's interested in the failure mechanism at work here: Voltage spikes perforate the dielectric, then the line voltage pushes enough current through them to heat the whole plate/dielectric package up which expands, cracking the encapsulation.

    I'm sure you meant "diagonal cutters". The term "pair of dikes" will get you in trouble with the politically correct types.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2011
    #12 likes this.
  11. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    That's what we've called them for the last 45 years, we were first :D
     
  12. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    I tried to heatgun it but still numbers came off with the poly.

    I bought a cap that matched my W x H x L.

    Mine is 22x10x15 and their's is 22x9x15.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/10pcs-474J-0-47...604?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2311901124

    Its 630v with 47uF
     
  13. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    It looks like 0.47µF (470nF) to me.
     
  14. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    Do you think it might work?
     
  15. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    Maybe, it's on the higher side of the range I would think so if it doesn't, try lower.
     
  16. Gdrumm

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    Have you contacted All Power?
    With the model #, they might be able to tell you something, or ship you a replacement board.

    Looks like the penny was dropped into the cooling vent by a small child.
    When it was started later, the penny jammed at 35,000 rpm, and shorted out againt the capacitor. See the burn marks at the bottom of the penny?

    Or, perhaps McGiver used the penny as a welding tip.
     
  17. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
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    I think the penny could be a replacement 30A fuse
     
  18. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Nope -- wrong spelling. Might get someone in Holland wondering why and how you'd use two big mounds of earth to ding up a penny though. :p

    For the younger under 40 or so folks, this refers to the old-style round fuses used in houses in the US built up to around the middle of the last century: many folks found that a copper penny could be used as a replacement fuse when no fuse was handy. Of course, it was also a stupid move, as there was now no fuse protection and a short could result in a fire. And with modern penny's that are no longer copper, it might even have a side benefit of a fire in the fuse box... :p
     
  19. KJ6EAD

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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2011
  20. EliteScouter

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 12, 2011
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    Yeah the item I have is:

    http://www.allpoweramerica.com/productdetails.php?id_prd=28

    It didn't die from being used or anything.

    I had it plugged in and it was in standby mode for like 10 days and then the next day I walk in the display was no longer on. I tried powering it on and nothing. If it died during use I would undestand but it just died while being plugged in and off.
     
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