Help identifying a few components (SMD)

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by willprice, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    Hello,

    [WARNING] Sorry - Pictures might be big, though I've resized them, though it appears dropbox hasn't updated the links yet, if they aren't fixed by tomorrow I'll upload them to a different provider.

    I managed to pick up a nice box of SMD components (all of their reels, I've spent the day wrapping them up and sorting them...), I've managed to identify all the resistors and I intend to measure the capacitors. I came across a few components that I'm unfamiliar with and having googled 'how to identify smd components' I didn't find much information that was particularly enlightening.

    There are only 4 parts that I could do with a bit of help identifying.

    Here are the selection of parts with an 1/8th watt resistor for scale.
    [​IMG]

    Here's what I think is a PNP transistor (wired up it works like one!) with the letters 'Z5N' on it, any ideas what the Z5N is?
    [​IMG]

    Here's a capacitor (I'm not sure what type it is?), it's 100uF (I presume the 107A is the value) with the code N02B2, not sure that that means.
    [​IMG]

    I am completely lost what part this is, I was searching through some component footprints and it looks like it could possibly be an inductor (I'm not sure how to test for this - I'll google it). It has no markings on it.
    [​IMG]

    Same with this part, no idea at all, it's resistance ~ 81.7K ohms
    [​IMG]

    If anyone could point me towards any resources that might help, I'd be awfully grateful.
    Regards,
    Will
     
  2. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    107A = 100uF tantalum cap. "A" is likely the voltage rating.

    The black block looks to be a diode, but is quite possibly an inductor as you said. A multimeter will tell which.

    "Z5N SMD transistor markings" can be googled.

    And the last thing is a 82k resistor.
     
  3. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    Thank you very much THE_RB. I broke one of the black blocks apart and the pads are connected, they're made up of one piece of metal which is then encased in the packaging -- definitely not a diode.

    I've tried googling the 'Z5N' markings but the second thing on google that comes up is this thread!

    Do you know what package the resistor is in?
    Cheers,
    Will
     
  4. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Regarding the Z5N component. I found a Z5 SOT-23 component BZX84C6V8. How correct this is. I have no idea. SMD component markings are often complicated. This is a site I use often use http://www.qsl.net/dl7avf/smdcode/index.html
     
  5. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    Thanks t06afre, that's a good website. I think you might be right, according to this data sheet http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/17621/PHILIPS/BZX84-C6V8.html, I measure a 0.7v forward voltage using the diode test mode on my meter.

    If anyone wants a few I'll pop a strip of 10 or 15 in the post (preferably if you're in the EU, better yet, the UK), maybe with a few other interesting curiosities I got if you fancy having a play with them.
     
  6. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Just to show some of the problems. All these are the same component
    Z5p BZX84-C6V8 Z-diode 6.8V±5%, 300mW SOT-23 PhH
    Z5t BZX84-C6V8 Z-diode 6.8V±5%, 300mW SOT-23 PhM​
    Z5W BZX84-C6V8 Z-diode 6.8V±5%, 300mW SOT-23 PhC
    PhC=Philips China; PhH=Philips Hong Kong; PhM=Philips, Malaysia
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    I think it's pretty safe to assume it's a 6.8v zener, and you can test with a 12v DC supply and a 1k resistor, and check it's reverse (zener) voltage.

    As for the unmarked black block which contains a block of metal, some diodes can look like that inside. An inductor would likely have something that looks like wire, even a few turns of very fine wire. Probably the most likely thing is some type of suppressor like a varistor or similar, they look like a block of metallic stuff inside.
     
  8. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    THE_RB, played around again with the diode it's definitely a 6.8v zener, thanks t06afre, that site's bookmarked now.

    The black block has zero ohms resistance either way, heating it makes no difference, there is no voltage drop over it. On closer examination, it transpires there is a small vertical notch above on one lead, presumably indicating polarity.
     
  9. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

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    "Zero ohms" is pretty unusual! Try putting 50mA, or 100mA through it using a resistor and a variable power supply (and it helps if you have a spare multimeter with a 200mA range). Then measure it's voltage drop when it has 100mA going through it.

    For instance use a 100 ohm resistor and a 0-12v variable supply, then adjuts it so a meter reads 100mA (or the resistor voltage reads 10v).

    Of course we are assuming that the device you are testing is not blown.
     
  10. bertus

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    Apr 5, 2008
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    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  11. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    Ah! Yes, I think it's very likely this might be ferrite, I've got a few beads in a box and comparing the two they seem very similar. Is there anything I can do to test this? (Please excuse my ignorance)
     
  12. willprice

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 24, 2012
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    Thanks THE_RB, I tried your suggestion -- 0 volts over the block, I guess it really has no resistance (I tried at 3.3 volts and 9 volts, I don't have a variable power supply yet).

    I'll solder another block up (I've got a few thousand on a reel) just to make sure, but given it's internal structure I wouldn't be surprised if that behaved exactly the same.
     
  13. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Sounds like it could be a ferrite bead then, if it has 0v drop with 100mA going through it.

    Normally they have a copper or steel wire and a ferrite bead or block around that. When you broke it open you said it just looked like one block of metal inside?
     
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