Help identifying a component

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by geauxldmember, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. geauxldmember

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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    Hello, new to forum and have a question that is probably very easy to more experienced people.

    I was working on an old RPTV and there is a connector mounted directly to a PC board. I can see that it has 80 pins. It's accepts a flat flexible type cable. To make it lock/unlock you have to pull up on the top part and it swings up, that lets you insert or remove the cable. Then you push it back down to lock it in place. Well bad luck would have it that the top cover part that swings up has broken. I would like to find a replacement.

    It looks like a fairly common component but I have no idea what you would call this thing to even locate something that could replace it. Trying a google search but hopefully someone here can help out.

    I attached a picture. You'll see three of the components I am talking about.

    thanks in advance for any help.
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Wow. It is using an 8051 and a Altera Cyclone FPGA

    What you are looking for is a ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) Flex connector.

    Ill let you wade through the pages, but a google search turned this up.

    http://www.adam-tech.com/pg153-155.pdf

    An email to the company with the attached photo will likely result in a find.
     
  3. geauxldmember

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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    Wow, thanks for the quick reply. I knew someone would know this one! :)

    Yeah, what you're looking at is the guts for a JVC LCOS TV. The lamp shines through a series of mirrors and filters then goes through the cubes you see in the middle and then projects up onto the screen.
    Pretty neat.

    It's at least 5 years old.

    I'll check out your info.

    thank you!


     
  4. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    That's pretty "high horsepower" for a TV controller. I'm impressed with the quality there. It almost looks over-engineered, unless it does some complex DSP operations.
     
  5. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Thats what I was thinking.
     
  6. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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  7. geauxldmember

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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  8. geauxldmember

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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    The ironic part about these TV's from what I've read on the Internet over the past few years is that many people had trouble with them.

    JVC makes some high end projectors and that's where this technology came from if I understand things. It was decided to build an RPTV around it.

    The LCOS design shows a nice smooth picture.

    One thing I read the TV does is automatically converts the input signals to 720P. Some sort of image scaler? There was some buzzword for it.

    I'm wondering if that's what the design is what you're seeing handles??
     
  9. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    Yes.

    Standard non-High Definition TV has 640 scan lines that are interlaced, the result is 30 frames per second, with half the screen redrawn (every other line) for each scan, hence "interlaced" and "half". The processors and memory on that board would combine the two image fields, then "upconvert" them to be 720p.

    720p means 720 scan lines, progressive (not interlaced). The TV output would be 30 frames per second of 720 non-interlaced lines, a great improvement over 640i (previous standard). 720p was going to be the standard for HDTV, but they went with a high end of 1080p (1080 lines, non-interlaced). The "runts" are 720i and 1080i, which do the every-other line method.

    In a nutshell, the TV was VERY advanced with the technology they had at hand. The ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) for upconverting and translating between input and output format is now a single IC that looks like the Altera labeled one, only smaller.

    The 8051 microcontroller (44 pin small square package at bottom) probably dealt with the menial tasks such as on screen display, closed captions, etc. Those functions too are now often included in an ASIC such as I mentioned above.
     
  10. geauxldmember

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 27, 2010
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    Very interesting. It would seem they had some good ideas. It's always cool to learn some like this and get an overview of how it would be implemented.

    thanks
     
  11. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
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    Most people don't realize just how low the resolution was on TVs until just recently, even the video amps couldn't keep up with much more than 300 or so lines of horizontal resolution.

    The newer TVs have fantastic capabilities but it's rare you'll ever have the source material to see it unless you're running BD / HDMI as the input, even then the eyes can only see so much unless it's a huge screen.
     
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