Help, I need my tiny components to stay put but the wax I've used melts when soldering

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Gladys Delgado-garced, Nov 19, 2015.

  1. Gladys Delgado-garced

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 19, 2015
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    Hello everyone I'm new to this forum. I happen to find it when I was looking for ideas for something else I was working on. I make jewelry and wearable tech fashion. I work with very tiny tiny LEDs and I have been able to solder thin wires and crimp beads to the -&+ Of the LED but, if there was a wax or something that can hold theses little buggers on my table, then soldering would be easier. I have used dental wax to hold down the LEDs but the heat from iron melts the wax and then I have a mess. I have tried tweeters but the LEDs that are tiny, won't stay. Does anyone know if there is a wax that holds up to heat so that I can press the LEDs on it a little, just to solder the wires and crimpbeads?
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    There must be one. I keep finding red dots under surface mount components. Maybe try cyanoacrylate (super glue). Then there is the method of holding the part down with pressure. I saw a rig that looked something like a drill press with a pencil mounted backwards so the eraser pressed on the component. You might try that if you have three hands or a nose like Pinocchio.:p
     
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  3. george0039

    Active Member

    Oct 15, 2008
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    If you use super glue, be careful, when heated it gives off terrible fumes and hurts the eyes and is dangerous to breath. Must use bench mounted fan to clear fumes from your face while soldering.

    George
     
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  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Post a datasheet or picture or part number to the LEDs you are soldering so I can see the exact size and format. Also, conform that you are doing point-to-point wiring. Of these LEDs, (no PCB). What wire thickness are you using?
     
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  5. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    You could use a reverse tweezer mounted in a vise. Or a regular tweezer with a rubber band to hold it closed, then mount the tweezer to something else.
     
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  6. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
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    Have you tried tinning (i.e. applying some solder to) the wire and then to the LED and then you may be able to press the LED down on to the wire with tweezers and apply the soldering iron, there should be enough solder to make a connection.
     
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  7. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Blue tack, or Black tack..adhesive putty.
     
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  8. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    You could use a clothespin which has had its legs reversed (see picture). That makes a simple, inexpensive clamp.
    rcc.jpg
     
  9. spinnaker

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  10. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I went to the drug store and bough a pack of those clippy things that women use for their hair. I bend the ends to the shape I need for clamping components to the circuit board.
     
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  11. spinnaker

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    Oct 29, 2009
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  12. Gladys Delgado-garced

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 19, 2015
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    here is the data sheet, i am not soldering them on a pcb. im soldering a 30 gauge wire to the postitive side and one to the negative side to use this on a necklace. i cant use super glue becasue theses LEDs are so tiny and i dont want to glue them down. I have soldered crimp beads to them and now the thin wires. I need them soldered so that i can then add the wires to a small coincell battery holder so the tiny LED turns on. I have been able to solder the wire to both sides, but it isnt easy because of the size. if i could place them down on a sticky substance so they dont move when im soldering that would be great, oh without buring the sticky substance. I tried the dental wax they give you when you first get braces on and it worked for the bigger LEDs, but theses get all the wax on them and then i cant use them cause of the wax. i have been trying tweeser but because of the LED size they pop off. trust me i have tried to figure out how to hold them down with different things. the clothes pins would be too big. thanks everyone for the great tips. i do have the tweezer and the 3 hands but when you see how tiny theses lights are youll understand why something sticky would be great. ill look for the blue tack, i did tin and that is how i was able to get the little bugger soldered. so the light has image.jpeg silicone over the back so it wont break off. it will sit when im done behind the flat part of this stone and then i will thread the wires through the chain and solder one wire to the battery holder and the other to the tiny magnet in the picture with the two battery holders to use a a switch. thank you everyone for the tips. I will post it when im done. image.jpeg

    Max. Reverse Current:
    1oua
    Brand Name:
    Made in China
    Max. Forward Voltage:
    3.2-3.4v
    Package Type:
    Surface Mount
    Max. Forward Current:
    20ma
    Max. Reverse Voltage:
    5v
    Model Number:
    ultra bright smd 0603 led
    Condition:
    New
    Type:
    LED
    color:
    green
    Volume:
    0603
     
  13. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    @Gladys Delgado-garced

    Something you can try (cheap) would be to...
    1) get a tube of silicone gasket sealant at the auto parts store (or Walmart).
    2) piece of window glass (smallest size available is about 8 x 10" at Home Depot for $2 or $3. Or, use the glass from an old picture frame.

    Put a thin line of caulk on the glass, press your LED into the clear caulk with your tweezers (copper side up), solder away. Let stand 24-hours. You can set up a bunch at one time. Use them when you need them.

    My only concern us how cleanly the LEDs will peal off. Letting the sealant cure completely will make it say together when it peels off. Also, it is combustible when first applied (some solvents) so keep solder iron away for 24 hours). It can withstand 500 F temps.

    I hope it works for you.

    One last note, put the line of sealant from left to right on the glass, then set the LEDs the tall direction as you look at them so the copper pads are not imbedded in the silicone. The silicone can act as a heat sink and make soldering difficult. Use a gentle touch - I'm not sure how strongly they will hold down.



    image.jpg
     
  14. Gladys Delgado-garced

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 19, 2015
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    image.jpeg
    here is what my LED looks like, 0603. I have used the last one in a wearable couture gown, for a pet fahion show last year. I soldered about 200 crimp beads so that i could sew conductive thread threw them. here is a pic.
    image.jpeg
     
  15. Gladys Delgado-garced

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 19, 2015
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    that is the silacone i used to seal the LED between the two wires. thanks ill try yr suggestion.
     
  16. Gladys Delgado-garced

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 19, 2015
    5
    0
    image.jpeg this was the finished piece.
     
  17. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    That is awesome but is seems very tedious. Next you'll be asking us how to make them flash in patterns.
     
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