Haveing some trouble read schematics

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Roen Hayden, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Roen Hayden

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    Haveing some trouble read schematics

    Hello ‘m having some trouble reading schematics. I was wondering if there was any advice one can give me…
     
  2. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
    1,202
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    That is incredibly vague, please clarify... I can imagine a large spectrum of answers, from recommendations of reading glasses to hierarchical design concepts...

    Steve
     
  3. Roen Hayden

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    Just reading them and understanding them in general. Mostly knowing what all the symbols mean, and how one knows how to build it on a bread board or soldering board.

    Your right I can see where that is vague hopefully that will clear it up.
     
  4. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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  5. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
    1,202
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    Reading schematics is one thing, but interpreting them is another. A lot of digital stuff is really easy to understand, since gate functions and flip-flops are pretty clear. When it comes to analog circuitry, that's where it takes years of schooling to understand properly.

    If you have a particular schematic, we can probably team up to help you interpret it.

    Steve
     
  6. mozikluv

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 22, 2004
    1,437
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    a schem is usually drawn starting from the left side of a page and ends at the right side. this is done to show how the signal flows thru the circuit. you will always notice that the signal is usually introduced as depicted on the left side and the output is depicted on the right side. this is the general principle behind it.

    as to the device symbols used in a drawn circuit, dave has already answered that.

    however in interpreting how the signal flows thru every stage, you just have to know how each device used functions

    moz
     
  7. horsebox

    Active Member

    Jun 9, 2007
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    Get a pair of glasses.
     
  8. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
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    First, get to know the passive parts and their operation and symbols: resistors, inductors, caps. Go on to the active parts such as transistors, FETs, etc. and their operation and symbols.

    When you get to circuits with active components, you'll see that they also use passive components for specific reasons. Some time after this point, you will start to be able to look at a schematic, and you'll be saying stuff like "That cap is blocking DC to the transistor which is set up as a common-emitter amplifier."

    (When I was in elementary school, I had a bad problem: I would look at the back of the textbook and think "How can I learn all this?" The answer, of course, was a little at a time. :D )

    It does look like a lot, but when I went to tech school, we all knew this stuff within 3 months. It may take you longer (unless you can devote 5 hours a day to it as I did), but is IS doable.

    --Rich :cool:
     
  9. Roen Hayden

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    On the schematic attachment below it looks like to me it have multiple grounds. Do I connect all the grounds the same place or deferent places? This is main trouble I’m having and I know there is a simple answer....

    Thanks for the help.
     
  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Yes, all of the grounds are connected together in that circuit.

    In some circuits, you may run across different ground symbols, like power ground, chassis ground, and analog or signal ground. In those cases, the grounds are connected together in only one place.
     
  11. Roen Hayden

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    so if i was to build that circuit I would make all the grounds connected to one point on the PCB?
     
  12. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Don't take that too literally. A connection common to all of those components may be done with a very windy foil trace. Things attached to the same wire are all connected together. You will only want the wire to DC common attaching to that foil at one place, though.
     
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