Have US border guards gone a little OTT

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by MaxHeadRoom, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. MaxHeadRoom

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    Jul 18, 2013
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    This month Mathew Harvey was excluded from entering the US for life for answering truthfully when the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service asked if he had ever smoked pot recreationally.

    "They said that I was inadmissible because I admitted to smoking marijuana after the age of 18."

    For the rest of his life, Harvey and other Canadians in his position must now apply for advance permission to enter the U.S. as a non-immigrant. The travel waiver, which costs $585 US ($752 Cdn), is granted on a discretionary basis, which means it may be good for a year, or two, or five, depending on the discretion of the approval officer.

    I suspect if Canada CBSA reciprocates and US citizens are truthful we will have very few US citizens crossing the border into Canada!.:rolleyes:
    Max.
     
  2. dannyf

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    while Seattle is opening up a safe use area for heroine / cocaine.

    this whole thing makes sense, however. we have undocumented immigrants, and we have released lots of undocumented pharmacists from jail. now we will have more undocumented patients.

    :)
     
  3. nsaspook

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    I've always pass the test (lie and verbal) for smoked pot recreationally because I would only use drugs for enlightenment. ;)
     
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  4. Sinus23

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    Well I mean if doesn't enlighten us then why should we bother anyways;)
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

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    I also have 3 acquaintances that are all over 50, they cannot enter the US because of a very minor offense on their record, obtained when all were around 18 yrs of age, If they need to it will cost a few grand in lawyer fees to obtain a temporary visa.!
    Max.
     
  6. nsaspook

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    The last thing we need is a bunch of snowback criminals in this country.:mad::p
     
  7. Sinus23

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    That is harsh.

    I can understand that the US has to deal with a great deal of drug trafficking and illegal immigrants(Which they somehow manage to make more than a fair deal of money on -Citation needed:oops:...).

    But denying people that should be able to move freely across the border 30 odd years ago after a minor offence is...One of the problems that shouldn't be a problem.
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

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    Do you know how to get a bunch of partying Canadians out of a bar at closing time?

    Ask them to leave.:rolleyes:
    Max.
     
  9. nsaspook

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    I think it's harsh also but it's also a little stupid telling a law enforcement officer you smoked pot when it's still a Federal crime. Long ago an old Chief told us, "Sometimes telling the truth will not set you free."
     
  10. MaxHeadRoom

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    AFAIK a person cannot be arrested in the US for having smoked pot 20years earlier. Bill Clinton would be in jail now!:p
    Max.
     
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  11. Sinus23

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    Never enter another country without a lawyer fully schooled in the laws of the country you're entering- Sinus23 10.09.16;)
     
  12. nsaspook

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    No but you can still be excluded from some forms of Federal employment ( in positions with access to sensitive information in law enforcement) as a citizen. Certain other three letter agencies don't really care about early use more than ten years ago. In my Navy clearance case the FBI (who conducts all SSBI's for TS level workers) asked family and friends and teachers and employers a lot of different questions so I didn't LIE to them about youthful enlightenment.
     
  13. GopherT

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    I've found that if one doesn't like the laws or practices of a country they plan to visit, they probably shouldn't visit.
     
  14. MaxHeadRoom

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    But referring to the OP reason, for two nations that purport to be friendly neighbors it seems a little OTT!
    I wonder if there is not some other agenda going on here?
    If CBSA decides to reciprocate it is going to make it awkward for US citizens crossing the border as well.
    Max.
     
  15. GopherT

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    If CBSA would enforce the same way, the Canadian side of Niagara Falls would be worth visiting - not elbow-to-elbow of American tourists. The line for the Maid if the Mist would be reasonable and traffic into Toronto would flow and I could get there when google Maps says I should get there.
     
  16. nsaspook

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  17. #12

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  18. nsaspook

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    That border crossing thing was horrible but we all know that only a gypsy would fly with a cello.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. GopherT

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    If that cello player was allowed to enter the country, she could potentially displace 50% to 100% of the citizens employed as cellists in the UK.
     
  20. nsaspook

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    It's also possible that the player was a secret agent in the US governments music torture operation.


    Start with AC/DC, warm up with Barney "I Love You" and then crack em with the cello.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2016
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