Have some old Intel P2114-A4 RAM chips to trade

Discussion in 'Marketplace' started by someonesdad, Mar 23, 2011.

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  1. someonesdad

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    I was just out in my shop rooting around for some old cable and I came across these old RAM chips. I bought them in the late 1970's when I lived in Silicon Valley; a coworker and I had Commodore PET computers and we got the chips to do something (I don't remember what it was). Then I moved out of state and forgot about the chips.

    There are 28 of the chips. I know that package hasn't been opened since I moved out of California 31 years ago, so they've just been sitting in a dark box.

    I'm not terribly interested in selling them (but if someone wants them, make me an offer by PM or put a horse's head in my bed :p). I'd rather trade for something I want.

    Here are some things I'm currently looking for:

    1. Circuitrim circular PC board mount pots, type 110 (nice for adjustment with fingers or screwdriver). I'd like 10, 50, 100, 500, 1k, 5k, 10k, 50k, 100k, and 1M.
    2. IRLD024 power MOSFET -- or something similar.
    3. Pomona 6883 dual binding post
    There are lots of other things I might be interested in (some low power voltage references and low power op-amps come to mind). If you're interested in these RAM chips or want to see a spreadsheet of the 300+ parts I have that also could be used for trading, please PM me.
     
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  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Those old PETs ate memory chips. I owned one for a while, then gave to my brother for a graduation gift. Just to make matters worse, they used a part number for RAM that was a duplicate of another chip (ah, those were the days). The 2114 (8X1K as I recall) was the upgrade from that fiasco.
     
  3. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Gosh, looks like:
    "Circuitrim circular PC board mount pots, type 110"
    haven't been around for quite a few years.
    They were made by International Resistance Company in the 1960's; there was a trademark lawsuit between IRC and Bourns. Can't find much else for them.
     
  4. someonesdad

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Interesting, SgtWookie, thanks for looking that stuff up. I took a close look at them in my box of pots and it appears the ones I have were all desoldered from something.

    They are beautiful little pots and turn with your fingers or a screwdriver. I'd love to have a ton of them. They're so smooth, but with just the right amount of friction.

    Now that I think about it, I probably got them from a 1970's Ithaco lock-in amplifier I bought on the ebay for $50 delivered (it was a boat anchor). It didn't work, but I harvested an amazing number of parts from it, including 10 turn dials, 10 turn trim pots, these Circuitrim pots, etc.

    Now that I look at them, I realize the pins on the bottom are too large compared to what would be manufactured today. But I will husband them and dole them out carefully only to deserving circuits. :p
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I'm curious what those pots look like - perhaps like these Bourns model 3352's?

    http://www.bourns.com/data/global/PDFs/3352.pdf
    Both a thumbwheel and a screwdriver slot.
    Digikey stocks those in both horizontal and vertical thumbwheel models.
     
  6. someonesdad

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Yeah, I've purchased a number of those (relatively cheap) style pots. I have a Bourns pot like the one you linked to (I don't know its model number; the three numbers on it were 7339V, 3353W, and 501).

    These old pots were quite classy. I've attached a picture (the scale marks are 1 mm).

    PM me and send me your address and I'll mail you one or two of them. I bet you'd love them. For a 1 k pot, I can dang near set it to the nearest ohm -- that's almost like a 5-turn or 10-turn pot. These were used on the PC boards inside this Ithaco lock-in, so these pots were only seen by service people. It was a beautifully-made piece of equipment and these were beautifully-made little pots.

    I also hooked up the Bourns pot I mentioned in the first paragraph and its adjustability was probably at least 5 times worse than these Circuitrim pots.
     
  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Those do look very nice.
    Thanks for the offer, but I'm downsizing at the moment.

    Found this snippet: "Name changed to IRC, Inc. 12/16/65 IRC, Inc. merged into TRW Inc. 2/19/68"
    on this page: http://www.scripophily.net/inrescomstoc.html
    TRW has since (2001) been acquired by Northrup Grumman.
     
  8. BillO

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 24, 2008
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    The 2114 was a 4x1024 SRAM. I would have offered $10 a piece for them in '77.

    I remember building a 16K byte expansion for my Ohio Scientific Superboard back then. 32 of these plus logic in sockets on a WW board. That board cost me $500 to build and it drew 2 amps. That was serious cash back then. If I had only invested that in rhodium and sold it when it was $20,000 and ounce...

    Ahh, the memories...
     
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