handling and soldering of static-sensitive devices

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by relicmarks, Nov 14, 2008.

  1. relicmarks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 13, 2006
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    How do u handle static sensitive components and devices ? what are some good tips and what are some bad things not to do?

    What can create static ? my boss says even wood creates static so i can't lay a PCB or static sensitve devices on wood

    How about soldering, is there a special way because they are static sensitive?
    use low temp?

    I wear a wrist band and rubber shoes , but what else when handling static sensitive devices and soldering them?
     
  2. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
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    A couple things to add:

    - Use anti-static, anti-magnetic tweezers for placement
    - If the devices have been exposed to moisture or a humid environment, you can bake them in the oven at low-temperature (see datasheet) so that they will not crack when being heated. This applies mainly to hot-air, wave-solder, or reflow.

    Steve
     
  3. relicmarks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 13, 2006
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    hot-air, wave-solder, or reflow.

    1.) Reflow - do u mean if i apply FLux and use the Hot air gun to reflow this will create static or moisture which is bad?

    anti-static, anti-magnetic tweezers for placement

    2.) What about the soldering iron or DVM or oscilloscpoe probes create static? can this create static?

    3.) Where or what do i use to lay the static sensitive components on? what would be a good material?
     
  4. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
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    Reflow / Hot Air : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflow_soldering

    The process doesn't cause moisture. I was saying, if the components are exposed to any kind of humidity or moisture, the plastic casing will absorb some of it. When being heated, the moisture will want to excape very quickly, sometimes fracturing the component. This is why you should bake the components at a low temperature to rid of moisture beforehand. This is why many components are packed with dissicant.

    As for soldering irons, usually the tips are grounded. There are some standards for this.

    For mats, seem to be made of vinyl, not sure.

    http://www.antistaticmat.net/

    http://www.apogeekits.com/anti_static_mat.htm

    Steve
     
  5. relicmarks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 13, 2006
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    so a anti-static MAT or vinyl would be the best thing?

    What about anti-static foam? remember to put dual in line chips , they use to come in that foam when u would buy them at the store?
     
  6. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
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    These are for work surfaces, which are exposed to lots of heat and nasty flux and other chemicals. Anti-static foam will simply not stand up to that abuse. Let alone many 0603s falling into the tiny holes.

    Steve
     
  7. relicmarks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 13, 2006
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    What are some really BAD things u can do that will cause static or damage static sen. devices?

    Can Wood really cause STatic?
     
  8. scubasteve_911

    Senior Member

    Dec 27, 2007
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  9. bertus

    Administrator

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  10. relicmarks

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Oct 13, 2006
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    solder IRON Anti-static protection: if you're interested in soldering a lot of static-sensitive parts (e.g. CMOS chips or MOSFET transistors), more advanced and expensive soldering iron stations use static-dissipative materials in their construction to ensure that static does not build up on the iron itself. You may see these listed as "ESD safe" (electrostatic discharge proof). The cheapest irons won't necessarily be ESD-safe but never the less will still probably perform perfectly well in most hobby or educational applications, if you take the usual anti-static precautions when handling the components. The tip would need to be well earthed (grounded) in these circumstances.
     
  11. floomdoggle

    Senior Member

    Sep 1, 2008
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    You might want to check with an electrician. If your structure is not properly grounded, stray charges can pop-up all over the place. A well grounded structure, and workbench, should be a given.
    Dan
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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