Hand Drill

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by tbiess@yahoo.com, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. tbiess@yahoo.com

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 2, 2010
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    Hi there, I have a Makita cordless hand drill rechargeable battery is not retaining the charge, the battery is not available in my country. I have a transformer in put 230 AC volt and out put 9 volt 1Amp I like to know whether I can use this output 9 Ac Volt through a diode bridge circuit to run the hand drill. Or any other way which can use this drill on 230 or 220 Volt Ac. Thanks, Tbi.
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,672
    899
    I suspect 1A at 9V will not be adequate for your drill. Can you provide a little additional information:

    1) Approximately how old is the drill? That is important to narrow down the possibilities for the type of battery it may have. Or, do you know what type of battery it has?

    2) What is the nominal voltage for the drill? For example, many have that information listed on the drill, such as 12V, 14.4 V....>20V.

    3) What is the maximum size of bit the drill can handle? A 1/4" (6mm) drill will require less power/current that a 1/2" (13mm) drill will.

    4) Can the battery holder for the drill be removed? If so, are the batteries inside it loose?

    John
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  3. tbiess@yahoo.com

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 2, 2010
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    Hi John,
    Makita Hand Drill,
    Model: 60120, D C 7.2V, 600/250 min REV. Type of battery : 9000
    Drill serial No.4451349 E, Drill Bit size maximum 10 mm.
    The battery is swollen. Hope these particulars will sufficient to advise me regarding my previous post. I really appreciate your trying to help me. Thanks John, waiting for your instructions. Tbi.
     
  4. marshallf3

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2010
    2,358
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    Many cordless drill batteries are nothing more than some AA NiCD or NiMH cells wired in series. If you can take the battery apart it should be repairable.

    Over here our local Home Depot stores have recycling containers for batteries such as this and it isn't unusual for a construction company to dump a dozen or so of a particular battery pack in there at the same time. People grab these, take them home and combine the good cells to make used but still servicable batteries again.

    I would highly emphasize never to try this with any Lithium battery as too many variables are involved, and in most cases the internal protection circuitry disables the battery pack when any one cell goes out anyway. It can be highly dangerous to play around with Lithium batteries.
     
  5. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Makita model 60120 does not come up as a valid portable drill number in Google or on the Makita site. Are you sure that is the complete number?

    7.2 volts can be obtained with a lot of different battery configurations, for example, 2X3.6V LiPo or 6X1.2V NiMH or NiCd. Since you say the cells are puffed, we can narrow the choices, if you tell us how many cells there are? Are they cylindrical or rectangular? A picture would help. What battery chemistries and sizes are available to you?

    I think you have these options:
    1) Build a replacement pack with individual cells. If they are NiCd (likely), you may not be able to get them in your country. NiMH may work, but they are not particularly good for service where the discharge rate is very high nor for fast recharging. The NiMH will probably be smaller than the NiCd's they replace, but adapters are made to convert NiMH cell sizes to NiCd or regular alkaline battery sizes.
    2) Build an external battery pack. In that case, size is unimportant.
    3) Use an external power supply (as you suggested), but I suspect you will need one capable of supplying several amps at the required voltage. 8.3 V may be the max. designed voltage of the drill. 9V probably won't kill it, but speed will be increased. Remember 9V was used for charging; the nominal value for the drill is only 7.2V. Corded drills may be cheaper and would probably work better than a cordless adapted to be corded and run off the mains.
    4) Other options, such a LiFePO4 batteries and similar newer chemistries will be more complicated and much more expensive. It is probably cheaper to buy a new drill than go that direction.

    John
     
  6. tbiess@yahoo.com

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 2, 2010
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    I have made mistake the model number is 6012D.
     
  7. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    The last cordless drill motor I used required 3 amps to run it, and that's without a load. Sounds like you need more current.
     
  8. tbiess@yahoo.com

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 2, 2010
    9
    0
    I have made a mistake the model of the Makita Cordless drill is 6012D; Sorry for the mistake the tag scratch marks, I use a magnifying glass to read the model. Thanks for trying to help appreciate very much. Thanks,Tbiess.:rolleyes:
     
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