Hall Sensor / Current Sensor Transducer Q.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by AMJC77, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. AMJC77

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    Hi I am using a Hall Sensor or Current Sensor transducer for a project in college. This is the link for the component here >http://ie.farnell.com/honeywell-s-c/csla2dj/current-sensor-transducer/dp/1703967?ost=1703967

    There is one thing confusing me, I understand how it can output a DC current/voltage from an AC input. I just don't understand what role the DC voltage supply has, it says on the spec that max supply voltage is 12V & min supply voltage is 6V.

    If you could help that would be great!
     
  2. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    the circuitry inside the hall effect needs power to operate. it is not just a hall effect transistor or a coil. there should be a link to the mfgr's specs on the farnham page that explains.
     
  3. AMJC77

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    I understand what you mean. For example, if i set up the Hall Sensor as the following:
    VCC = 6V & GND = 0V
    The output for the sensor will be 3V. I don't understand what consequence this would have to the output.
     
  4. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    then the output voltage depends on the magnetic polarity and strength.
     
  5. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    I can't get the datasheet page to load, however the device appears to be a current sensor (current transformer for I[AC] and a hall-effect sensor for I[DC]) thus it would seem, as per a previous poster, that the unit contains active circuitry requisite of DC power -- apart from the measured current...

    Best regards
    HP
     
  6. RichardO

    Well-Known Member

    May 4, 2013
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  7. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    OK, let's take a look at the data sheet and see what we have. Your sensor will sense AC or DC current above and below zero with a range of 225 Amps peak. Reading the data sheet for your sensor as an example with a Vcc = 8 Volts the sensitivity is 8.7 mV / Amp. So, with 225 Amps we get 225 * .0087 = 1.9575 Volts. With an AC signal the output will swing Vcc / 2 (Offset) between about 6 Volts and 10 Volts. This is why the Vcc must be between a positive number and a positive number or as they suggest 6 to 12 Volts. With the case of Vcc = 8 Volts and 0 to 225 Amps the output will be between 6 and 10 Volts. The same is true for a DC current. Think about the charge and discharge of a large battery. I can be charging at 225 amps or discharging at 225 amps. Well, 0 to 225 Amps. :)

    Make sense?

    Ron
     
  8. AMJC77

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    That's great, thanks very much for your help gents. Much appreciated!
     
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