good enginering

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by eng.mustafasalah, May 11, 2013.

  1. eng.mustafasalah

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 10, 2011
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    hi every one ..

    How do I become a successful engineer ?
     
  2. circuitfella11

    Member

    May 10, 2013
    56
    5

    just think outside the box..always..

    find your targets..accomplish something..

    ask and learn.. read and think.. :D

    well, it will take you several years to do that...:cool:
     
  3. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    This is like going to an arts forum and asking how you become a successful artist.

    The question is so broad that there is no way to answer it except in the broadest terms.

    If you don't love engineering, also known as problem solving, then get out.

    If you aren't willing to commit yourself to a lifetime of continually learning new things and always finding out how little you really know from all your previous learning, then get out.
     
  4. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    True that. When you get the degree, your education is only begenning.
     
  5. circuitfella11

    Member

    May 10, 2013
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    not all are learned in schools, institutions, etc.. getting the degree doesn't mean you already know many things..just like brownout said, its only the beginning.. after getting the degree and start your career, you'll always see a larger part of what you don't know of..

    to be a successful engineer? first step is loving what you do in engineering..
     
  6. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    One of the key things I tell students: It's fine if you don't love engineering, but never forget that you are competing against people that do.
     
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  7. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I love engineering, but I often compete against people who are alot smarter than I.
     
  8. circuitfella11

    Member

    May 10, 2013
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    that's good.. because sometimes we learn a lot when we compete, specially with smart people..

    most of the time i share some ideas with them, well, i get more from them..:D:D:D
     
  9. count_volta

    Active Member

    Feb 4, 2009
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    The best advice I can give is, work on some projects as a hobby. Come up with some cool projects. Build a robot, build an audio amp, build a fridge that shoots beer at you. Build something. FOR FUN.

    Trust me, doing that stuff got me engineering jobs before and I learned a lot. It helps to connect the dots of the stuff that you learn in school. You will fail at first, but keep trying and when you finally succeed you have just become a better engineer. I honestly don't believe you can become a good engineer unless you tinker with stuff for fun and solder it together yourself.

    Even if its not the best design in the world, it WORKS and that is all that really matters.
     
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  10. Buxton137

    New Member

    May 16, 2013
    4
    1
    Don't forget to use all your senses, don't just see the problem feel it,( When safe to do so)
    listen for the slightest details, smells,And taste that is how i was taught to fix the side car when my dad use to race

    Don't feel afraid to ask for advice
     
  11. jeccyka

    New Member

    May 7, 2013
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    0
    I trust ”Interest is the best teacher“, many excellent electronic engineers are electronic enthusiasts since childhood. The engineer must have "their own thoughts", importantly, they dare to put their theories into practice. Then Create brilliant achievements.
     
  12. swr999

    New Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    3
    0
    If you want some inspiration on being a good engineer, do a search on: Jim Williams analog engineer.

    Jim Williams was one of very few "super stars" in circuit design. He got interested in electronics as a kid, went to college (psychology I think) but quit after a year. Took a job at the MIT mail room to be close to where "interesting stuff" was happening. Pretty soon he was hired to work in a MIT lab doing electronic design and repair. After 8-10 years at MIT he was recruited by and went to work for Linear Technology, where he remained for the rest of his career. He wrote many, many design articles, application notes, and books on the art and practice of electronic design. He was always curious, no formal education in engineering. Shared his knowledge. A 'good' engineer. Check him out. Here's a start:
    http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs...s-after-stroke
     
  13. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    I've read a number of his articles and like them. He is definitely a good inspiration, as long as people don't come away with the notion, "Well, he never had any formal education in engineering, so I don't need any either." (And I'm sure that is NOT what you were implying in any way.)

    The number of people that can truly succeed at anything without significant formal education and/or training is very small. Those few people have other things going for them -- usually including an extreme level of drive, focus, discipline, and intensity -- that allows them to succeed in spite of the lack of formal education and training. Those same rare traits allow some of them to not just succeed, but to excel and reach the pinnacle of their profession. It is actually not too surprising that you can point to a number of super-successful people and see that they lack formal education in the field they are so successful at, but to draw the conclusion that, for the overwhelming majority of people, a signficant investment in formal education and training is unnecessary would be erroneous.
     
  14. swr999

    New Member

    Mar 30, 2011
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    ^^^ Exactly. There are those few who will succeed in any case. For the rest of us, finish your EE. Then if you get in with a good company you'll really appreciate what you can learn.
     
  15. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
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    To engineer = To make stuff

    To get good at something; do it a lot, with a lot of care, effort and study.

    A person who can show they have made a lot of stuff proves they are good at making things.

    A person who can show they got lots of good marks in the classroom proves they are good at getting marks.

    If I hire someone it would be to hire them to make things, not hire them to get marks. ;)
     
  16. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,498
    507
    Problem solving is the main objective of an engineer. If you are a designer, you are given a problem and you have to create something that solves the need. One of the most discouraging parts of being an engineer was when I gradually realized that problem solving was not as easy as I used to think:

    in the real world you will run into many people who do NOT want the problem to get solved because the problem is what justifies their job. A lot of times I remember having the best and simplest solution only to have it shot down because it wasn't what they wanted to hear and it threatened the status quo.

    Life is complicated.
     
  17. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    As already pointed out, engineers are, first and foremost, problem solvers. That is the thing of value we bring to the table and that others are willing to pay good money for.

    So if you don't love problem solving (and I mean love it), then get the hell out of engineering. You will probably never become really good at it and will struggle to make a mediocre living doing something you will quickly grow to hate.

    Then choose a field of engineering that you love -- don't worry about finding the perfect match, nothing is engraved in stone and if you love problem solving, you will probably learn to love whatever field of engineering that you choose as long as it is a reasonable match for your interests. If you are, at heart, a true engineer then someone could pick a field out of a hat and you would quickly learn to enjoy it because you would accept it as a challenge to become good at it.

    If you don't love engineering and are only pursuing it because someone has convinced you that engineers make good money, you need to get the hell of out engineering. Engineering is a competitive market and never forget that even if you don't love engineering, you will always be competing against people that do.
     
  18. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    Ah, I see that I've already posted the gist of my last point earlier in the thread. Oh well, it's a point that bears repeated emphasis.
     
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