GFCI plug question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by 1-3-2-4, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. 1-3-2-4

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 26, 2008
    194
    1
    What is that thing with the little spring on it?
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,510
    2,369
    I would say it is the leakage detector trip operator?
    Max.
     
  3. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    Either a thing-a-ma-bob or a doo-hicky.

    Final answer.
     
  4. 1-3-2-4

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 26, 2008
    194
    1
    well I need to know what the spring part is for because i had an issue where it would not reset but when it's reset and you press the test, you can hear the GFCI buzz, about 4 presses caused a small flash inside but I don't see any damage, and it seems that part was laying on the resistor or the ground wire.
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,257
    6,760
    I thought it was the solenoid that changes gears from agitate to spin...:confused:
     
  6. 1-3-2-4

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 26, 2008
    194
    1
    Yeah I'm looking at it, seems to be a solenoid, assuming pressing the test causes it to trip what does it do push out? to touch the ground?
     
  7. Electric Al

    Member

    Nov 6, 2013
    58
    8
    That part with the spring on it is the plunger from a solenoid.

    Obviously it is Kaput !

    Don't try to repair it , throw it away . PLEASE !
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,510
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    Look for a cap etc that possibly keeps the plunger retained?
    Max.
     
  9. 1-3-2-4

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 26, 2008
    194
    1
    In that cause I would just replace it with a non GFCI cord, it goes to a window AC and replacement cords start at $40
     
  10. Electric Al

    Member

    Nov 6, 2013
    58
    8
    Was it specd for your window shaker to be plugged into a gfci protected circuit ?
     
  11. killivolt

    Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
    342
    310
    You wouldn't think so, the AC unit probably on startup would exceed the GFI?

    But, then again if the GFI is rated for it, who knows?

    Does it have specs on it?

    Edit: After some reading apparently it's used where there is an increase in Electrocution. Outside or around pools, mostly moisture related. If this is or was a child's bedroom or such you might find it there. Otherwise, like you said just replaced it with a regular outlet.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  12. jfwfmt

    New Member

    Nov 10, 2013
    4
    2
    GFCI don't care about current, only differential current. Standard GFCI receptacle will handle a current of 20A. They contain a current transformer with the hot wire going through in one direction and the neutral wire going through the other way. It is designed to trip on a differential current in excess of 6mA.

    Just trashing a GFCI plug on an appliance is not a good idea. It is there for a reason - to protect from shock. If you don't get the exact replacement cord/plug, you can put a GFCI receptacle in the box you are plugging into to. If you are not qualified to do that, you can get portable GFCI.

    Remember the air conditioner has water condensate in it during operation. A failure can be fatal.
     
    killivolt likes this.
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