Gardening thread

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by strantor, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. strantor

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I had a garden experiment last year some may remember. I was mainly growing out of planter pots. Well this year I've stepped up my game. I've got 21 varieties of garden veggies germinating right now and I'm going to till up the whole back yard to plant the seedlings. Pics to follow.

    Anybody else have a garden going this year? I'd love to see pics!
     
  2. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Way to go strantor!

    I have a small plot in my garden that I grow veggies every year.
    The usual crops are peas, beans, lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, onions, chives, garlic (plant in the fall), parsley. I also have a small strawberry patch.
     
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  3. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
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    Your whole back yard? Bet that will cut down on mowing, but I'd hate to have to weed that everyday. :p

    We did a small (3' x 6') garden in our backyard last year and plan to do the same this year. I'd like to put it into one of those simple raised bed kits you can buy at the big box stores, if for nothing else than to make it easier to mow around (and not over :eek:). Technically, I'm supposed to go through the HOA for anything with a 'border' around it and my backyard faces other front yards, so I've been hesitant.

    I've been wondering if there's anything one can do to help keep weeds from germinating so weeding is reduced. I've recently been wondering if putting the garden on a deck or in a 3-4' raised bed would help? Speculation being fewer weed seeds traveling higher in the air, but probably not. If nothing else, it'd be easier to pick veggies and weed because one would be standing instead of being on the ground on hands and knees.
     
  4. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    H.O.A. are taking over ,they can take your house from you if you don't follow the

    rules. A few people don't want think that a H.O.A. law exsist like zip codes. I have

    been by farms and seen sign that said H.O.A. meets thur nite,they are everywhere.
     
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  5. Metalmann

    Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    This is the first year that I'm not putting out a garden. Sitting here with bunches of Heirloom seeds, and didn't even start them. Bending over...doesn't work as good as last year.:(

    Heirlooms are for a much tastier product, even though they don't look like store bought veggies.;)
    Back in the day, everyone kept their seeds for next years planting.:cool:
     
    shortbus likes this.
  6. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    Well hopefully weeding will already be at a minimum because half my yard has been covered by a ...erm... structure (long story) for a couple of years and has zero plant life growing on it currently.

    Better get started soon (now). Last year I didn't get started until the end of may, and that was too late. I'm even starting later that I should right now.

    The half of my yard that has grass, I am cutting out of the ground as sod and transplanting to the front yard because the HOA is b!tch!ing about the bare spots. Hopefully they'll allow us to live here for another year...

    Last year my garden was in raised planters on legs up off the ground. I didn't have much problems with weeds growing, but I also wasn't troubled with my veggies growing very much there much either. Nothing but pitiful runt plants. I think the problem was here in the TX heat, the heat can get at the roots from all sides and bottom, which the roots don't like. they want the natural coolness that real earth provides.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Something is wrong here. I ran 1000 sq ft of garden for about 7 or 8 years and can't remember weeding. Maybe Florida is special?
     
  8. shortbus

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    I put black plastic sheeting (Visqueen) down after tilling. Cut small holes for the plants, and no weeding that way. For plants from seed, wait until they get the second set of leaves, and put plastic on both sides. Another benefit is less watering.

    Strantor, you don't germinate everything first do you? Only have to do that with stuff like tomato's, peppers and zucchini.
     
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  9. #12

    Expert

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    I never planted seedlings except for tomatoes and broccoli.
    What worked without pre-germination? Corn, any kind of melon or squash, beets, radishes, carrots, beans, cucumbers. That's what I can remember right now.

    ps, lucky I didn't know it was illegal to have a vegetable garden in my yard until I had grown tired of it and quit all by myself. Maybe nobody ever complained. Maybe nobody else knew about that law either?
     
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  10. elec_mech

    Senior Member

    Nov 12, 2008
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    I'm a bit north of you. Virginia is still in 40- low 60's most of the time right now. Had a bunch of snow less than 2 weeks ago. Global warming my behind! :mad:

    I say this with endearment - I hate you. ;)
     
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  11. #12

    Expert

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    I do own a hoe, but there are no wear marks on it. I might have used it a dozen times in 7 or 8 years.
     
  12. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    I might not be using the proper term. I planted all my seeds in these little peat pots that go into a little greenhouse (see pic). Supposed to plant them (whole peat pot and all) once they are seedlings. I did this for all my stuff; sunflowers, watermelons, pumpkins, corn, peas, carrots, cilantro, broccoli, lettuce, cabbage, onion, brandywine tomatoes, cantaloupe, parsley, jalapenos, cayenne peppers, eggplant, oregano, chives, and cucumber. They're all in 2 of those 50 pot mini greenhouses, 100 pots total.

    Is this not the way to do it? I thought it was OK since they're "germinating" (not sure that's the right term) in the same soil that they're going to be planted in; well, actually they're planted already. Last year I germinated all my seeds in plastic baggies with moist toilet paper; I thought that was the no-no.
     
  13. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    Well I got all that pesky useless carpet grass out of the way... or least a patch of it. It's a lot harder than I thought it would be. Actually, I didn't think about how hard it would be. Worked all day and cleared an 8.5'X18' spot. Unfortunately, 75% of it was weeds that I was not able to move to the front yard. So I have a huge pile of what we'll call next year's compost. Tomorrow my tiller should be in from Amazon and I can mix my cow crap in, and be ready for planting.

    before & after pics attached.
     
  14. shortbus

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    The "starting" of vegetables is not really necessary, won't hurt anything but really not needed. Stuff like tomato's peppers and the like that you buy as seedlings, is a way for stores to make more money. Would you rather sell a pack of seeds for a $1 or a pack of seedlings for $5?

    One year long ago we tried an experiment, planted seeds and waited for them to come up in one row. In the next row we planted seedlings after the first row had about three sets of leaves. They both bloomed and had fruit with in days of each other.

    When you transplant seedlings they stop growing until the roots spread big enough to support the size of the plant. The ones from seed, their roots are growing at the correct rate for the plant from the start. The root growth in ground is basically the same size as the diameter of the above ground plant.
     
  15. maxpower097

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    Feb 20, 2009
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    The lil peat pots work but many plants roots aren't strong enough to break thru them. So you will only use those for plants with hardy tap roots. For others with frail roots use lil foam cups(with soil), rockwool or coconut wool cubes, etc.. Something that won't choke the roots out. Those peat plugs work much better in the ground then in that "clone dome" Proper term for germination tray, because the moisture in the dirt will help degrade the peat for the roots to break thru.
     
  16. maxpower097

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    Feb 20, 2009
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    This isn't exactly tru, like in hydroponics as long as you can get the plant enough nuits it will keep growing reguardless of root size. The reason your plants stop growing for a week or two when you replant them is root shock. When you take the rootball out of a pot or ground it shocks the plant and it stops growing for a lil while.

    As for root size depends on the plant. Some huge plants will have wide shallow roots. Some huge plants have roots that do really deep. Some are just lots of roots the same size. Some have a huge tap root with lil stringers trailing off. Just depends on the plant for rootsize and shapes.
     
  17. #12

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    The only purpose I can think of for peat pots is if you're too early for planting season. You can get things started when the ground is too cold. Whichever seeds will survive without that kind of help, just plant the seeds. Otherwise, you're wasting time and money pampering plants that don't need it. I wouldn't say you're "wrong" but it seems a waste of time and money to grow sprouts, then plant them, unless there is some reason a seed can't survive in the ground without help.
     
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  18. maxpower097

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    They deal with late freezes and really hard ground in other states so I can imagine starting em off in pots or cups first just to give em a fighting chance in the outdoors. I remember the first time up north I was in the hills in TN. Was shocked how hard the ground was. People told me to dig a hole you have to put a hose in it. Flood it for 4 hours, then dig another foot or two, then soak it again, then dig another foot, etc... etc..... I thought they were joking till they said try to dig a hole and tossed me a shovel. I could barely get 8 inches before I gave up.
     
  19. #12

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    Been there, done that. Kentucky is made of red concrete with extra rocks. Dig a post hole with a clamshell digger? 35 whacks for the first inch, 25 whacks in a soft spot, and I have the upper body of a guy that did 25 years on crutches. It took me a week to put in 37 post holes that were 24 inches deep, and I don't mean between TV shows. I mean, 9 to 5, every day, for a week.
     
  20. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    Were there no gas powered augers within driving distance? I would think that that the rental surely, and the purchase price maybe, would have been justified against a full week's work if expressed in dollars.

    I put in a fence one summer and most of it was in sandy loam. so soft that you just drop the diggers from shoulder height and they fall 6" into the ground. There were a few spots however that were sandstone or solid hard red clay. For those, we borrowed an old man's tractor from down the road that had a PTO driven auger attachment.

    Anyway, I don't envy you.
     
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