Fused Distribution Block

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by fredp, Jul 18, 2010.

  1. fredp

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2009
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    Hi,

    This is more of a question about technique than actual circuity, but I am wondering how to implement a tasteful, secure distribution block that has fuses on each circuit.

    Say I have a 15 amp line entering my project box, and I want to distribute the power to some smaller circuits--fusing each one. You can buy distribution blocks, but none of the professional looking, rated ones are fused. Most fuse blocks seem to have connections on each side of the fuse instead of having one side of all of the fuses common.

    I have a lot of experience with automotive wiring, which is always implemented like I described. High current enters a fuse block and many individually fused lines leave. Unfortunately, blade style fuses are not intended for high voltage uses, so I don't see any way of doing this cleanly without a bunch of wire splices--which I like to avoid.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    I know what you are thinking...why not have the same blade fuse like in cars at our house DB..right.
    Like u said HV, but what we have here are circuit breakers.
    Which is better than blade fuses
     
  3. fredp

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2009
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    Yeah, the blade fuses actually have some exposed conductor--if you press them just right, you come in contact with the conductor and that can be a serious problem.

    It isn't really practical to put breaker panels in a small project. I wish I could find fuse blocks that worked similarly to a distribution panel, but with barrel style fuse or something.
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    I think we do have tht.
    U are just not looking at the right places...

    Me & u, We are geniuses. U can make what u want, if you put ur mind into it.
    Always worked for me.
     
  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    What voltage? High doesn't really mean anything...
    It's pretty easy to get inline panel mount fuse holders and simply bus the input together...
    Or add them on a circuit board to create your distribution
     
  6. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Talk to the OP about how high he wants.
     
  7. fredp

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2009
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    nominal 110v. I understand that you could just tie the inputs together, but that gets pretty messy I would think there would be products available where that is already done.
     
  8. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    HA!! 110VAC high enuf for ya...
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Thats better now it actually gives a starting point (high means nothing without a number depending on the industry/application you're talking about).. For him high is 110VAC.. to me high is in the kilovolt range and 110V is low voltage.

    Blade fuses are typically only rated to like 32VDC as they are usually for automotive applications and are not suitable for anything else.
    I really doubt you will find what you are looking for. Typically stuff like that is done via individual panel mount/pcb mount fuse holders ganged together on the line input. A quick search on digikey/newark/mouser will show you whats out there.
     
  10. fredp

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 24, 2009
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    thanks mcgyver,

    How would you gang them together? Just with wire ties or crimp connections with several in each one. Things like that just tend to look kinda hacked to me, so I am curious about how the pros do it?
     
  11. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Or just solder the fuse holder on a vero board nicely and encase it
     
  12. williamj

    Active Member

    Sep 3, 2009
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    fredp

    Try making a copper buss bar that fits the number of fuse blocks (mounted side by side) needed. Copper bar is easily worked with drill and file and should be available at most homecenters and or online industrial supply houses.
     
  13. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    I would not recommend a copper bar (unless you are bolting to it) as soldering can be troublesome. You might end up with a cold/weak solder joint or melt the fuse holder internals in the process. It takes quite a bit of heat input to get the bar up to the required temps (depending on the size of the copper bar)..
    My suggestion would be to simply make a daisy chain using wire and female quick connect terminals and use fuse holders with male Q.C. terminals and simply plug it in. If this is a professional product where agency testing might come into play make sure your terminals are rated to accept multiple wires in a single terminal and use the proper crimping die.
     
  14. whatsthatsmell

    Active Member

    Oct 9, 2009
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  15. williamj

    Active Member

    Sep 3, 2009
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    Fredp

    Mcgyvr is correct about not soldering to copper. Soldering to copper requires soldering as a plumber would solder using a propane torch. When I suggested the copper buss bar I had invisioned mechanical fastening but failed to explaing it entirely.

    My apologies, communications have never been one of my strengths, which is why I don't post very often.

    williamj
     
  16. williamj

    Active Member

    Sep 3, 2009
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    I can't spell either! :/ lol

    williamj
     
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