Function of Resistor in Clamper circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by lynnfaiz, Jun 29, 2015.

  1. lynnfaiz

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    Dec 16, 2012
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    Hi, May i know what is the function of the resistor in a Clamper circuit?
     
  2. AnalogKid

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    No schematic, no answer.

    ak
     
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  3. Hypatia's Protege

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    Do you, perchance, mean a (dissipative) snubber circuit?

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  4. #12

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    That's one idea. I had a completely different idea, input protection. That's why we ask for a schematic.
     
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  5. GopherT

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    It sets the time constant (with the capacitor). The time constant should be close to the tau of the frequency you are putting into the clamper.
     
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  6. GopherT

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  7. Hypatia's Protege

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    You have more faith in the erudition of 'noobs' than I:D:D:D

    Then too, many folk use the terms interchangeably:rolleyes:

    TTFN
    HP
     
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  8. lynnfaiz

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    Dec 16, 2012
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    Sorry for no schematic diagram . pls find attached. The resistor parallel to the Vout
    Clamping-Circuit1.jpg Clamping-Circuit1.jpg
     
  9. #12

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    You call this a clamp. To me, it looks like a level shifter. It changes the center of the sine wave to a more positive level. If you look from a different point of view, it clamps the most negative excursion of the sine wave.

    You see that the resistor is in parallel with the diode and battery. Move the resistor to the left and see that it allows current to flow in and out of the capacitor. Without the resistor, the diode would act as a rectifier like a voltage doubler circuit and the output would become a positive DC voltage. Therefore, the resistor keeps the circuit from being merely a rectifier. The resistor and capacitor must be the right amount compared to the frequency. If there is too much resistance, the circuit will tend to be a voltage doubling rectifier. With too little resistance the output will be attenuated.
     
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  10. Hypatia's Protege

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    Strictly speaking, that's precisely what a 'clamper' (not to be confused with a 'clamp') is (go figure:rolleyes:) -- FWIW I've long felt said bizarre nomenclature is cause of the considerable confusion of the terms 'Clamp', 'Clamper' and 'Snubber' (which being representative of distinct functions)... Wadda world! Wadda world!!!:(:rolleyes:

    In case anyone cares, the following cursorily describes the functions from one another:

    Clamp: Limits the maximum EMF across itself (e.g. MOVs, 'back-to-back' diodes, etc...)

    Clamper/'clamping circuit':
    Shifts the level of an AC waveform so as to 'set' either the maximum or minimum EMF

    Snubber:
    'Suppresses' and dissipates or 'recycles' transient energy


    Best regards
    HP
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2015
  11. DickCappels

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    Not intending to put too fine a point on it, back in the days when video meant an analog signal, we called that circuit a diode clamp or a DC restore circuit and it was used to establish the D.C. level of the black peaks of the signal, or in some cases the sync tips.

    D.C.-wise the battery, diode, and resistor are all in series. The resistor provides the average bias current for the diode so that within a short time of turn-on the cathode of the diode is at V1-Vdiode on negative peaks of the signal. The resistor also assures that the output is at V1-Vdiode when no signal is present.
     
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  12. AnalogKid

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    The master beat me to it. The schematic is a video "tip clamp". Note the polarity of the diode. By rule the negative peaks of the color subcarrier never can extend below the sync tip, so this clamp circuit is the first step in re-establishing the DC level of the video signal. In quality gear, it is followed by a "back porch clamp" that uses the trailing edge of the now-stabilized sync pulse to start a timed clamp (usually by a diode switch or transistor switch) in the space between the sync pulse and the video, to establish a DC level that is independent of changes in the sync pulse amplitude.

    I miss real video.

    ak
     
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  13. #12

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    You can tell my history doesn't go back that far. When I was working on TVs I was pretty much a Tube Jockey practicing up to be a Beginner. I rarely got into the shop with the oscilloscopes so I could explore mysteries like, "How do you get a vacuum tube to set a DC level of one or two volts by working with 300 volts of supply and 20% resistor tolerance?" :confused:

    I never did figure that out. I was on to the next job: precision analog design with the newfangled LM301 op-amp and some 1% resistors. :)
     
  14. GopherT

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    Do you need any of those LM301 or LM311H (in the fancy & trendy tin can package)? I know a guy who knows a guy.
     
  15. ian field

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    There was a Clamper in an episode of Futurama when Bender joined the robot Mafia.
     
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  16. AnalogKid

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    While I was in school I worked nights at a TV station. Young and restless and bored, we built a broadcast quality video recorder.

    ak
     
  17. DickCappels

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    @lynnfaiz,

    Did you get a satisfactory answer to your question?
     
  18. Hypatia's Protege

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    Crickets? -- Rare indeed is a n00b's followup;):rolleyes:
     
  19. lynnfaiz

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 16, 2012
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    thanks for this answer. n thanks everyone too!
     
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