Fullerene and Similar Molecules

Discussion in 'General Science' started by Wendy, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. Wendy

    Thread Starter Moderator

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    While Fullerene (C60) can be considered an offshoot of graphene, there are enough differences to make it interesting and unique. C60 is just the simplest molecule, there is no end to it. It resembles a soccer ball using carbon atoms.

    I found this article I thought was interesting...

    Simulation shows it's possible to move H2O@C60 using electrical charge
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  2. Brownout

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    Jan 10, 2012
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    As I recall, Fullerene was named after Buckminster Fuller, who invented structures with the similar geometry as the Fullerene molecule, including the Geodesic Dome.
     
  3. Wendy

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    True enough. If you add graphene sheets to the bucky ball (the other name for it) you can have a true monofilament, with no real maximum length defined. It would be a super strength material, possibly a super conductor.
     
  4. SplitInfinity

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    You know...I remember reading something about this...but I can't remember where...how they were using Graphene for constructing a monofilament with crazy strength, abilities and apps...and they were using...SOMETHING...I can't remember...to be able to quickly make very long lengths of this stuff.

    Now as I am sure all know how strong a Bucky Ball is...but think about a monofilament capable of towing a semi as well as cutting through steel.

    Can you remember what it was they were using to help make long lengths of this?

    Split Infinity
     
  5. Wendy

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    doping liquid lead (solder?) with carbon, then drawing it out slowly, where it self assembles. Soot is natures version of bucky balls, but it tends to spiral one itself, much like a conch shell. No perfection there.

    We have a lot to learn about fabrication, but it is coming along. Much like aircraft, it will be a case of slow steady improvements.
     
  6. SplitInfinity

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    I don't think this was the method but what lengths were they able to achieve without breakage?

    Split Infinity
     
  7. Wendy

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    I don't know. It has been a while since I have seen an update, much of this type of research is on the bleeding edge, and scientists hate to make claims they haven't triple checked in triplicate.

    The problem with nano materials is it is hard to get samples large enough to test sometimes. Then there is the commercial factor, who gets there first is going to make gobs of cash if they are a big company. The small guys almost always get screwed out of it, and most universities hook up with a company somewhere along the way.

    Using liquid metal in CO2 is the only way I have heard of to date.
     
  8. SplitInfinity

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    Bill...since I am interested in your topic...I made a call to a friend who tends to know about cutting edge tech. and how and to what level of ability such tech...can be manufactured. This friend dedicates the majority of his day doing research and making calls to obtain such knowledge for purposes I am sure you can figure out.

    I asked him about this and he told me that there are currently TWO U.S. based companies that share or jointly own a subsidiary that is currently making extremely long and extremely strong lines that are NOT USING THE SAME MATERIAL as is explained in your topic.

    I asked him what the hell material was being used and he would not tell me but he DID tell me that the process and ability to manufacture such great lengths...and by lengths I had to ask..."Longer than...? Meters?"...and so on...and this game went on until the meter length I asked was 1000.

    As for the process...and after thinking a great deal about his answer which at first did not make sense to me until a Light Bulb went on in my head...he mentioned Lasers and the created vacuum that follows in a Gas.

    Now I think I have a pretty good idea about what he was refering to and if you do also...perhaps you could PM me with your thoughts as I don't think my friend thought I would be able to figure it out from the two key words he gave me. Which is pretty stupid for him to do considering I helped him make a lot of money by taking my advice and taking a Stock Option and Selling Short. Even though every one of the so called..."EXPERTS"...was screaming...BUY! BUY! BUY!

    So if you have the time and inclination...send me a PM on your thoughts?

    Split Infinity
     
  9. Wendy

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  10. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

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    a back room in the tiny web of nanotech websites. http://www.somewhereville.com/?page_id=10

    browse and contemplate the images...star trek type tech may come to pass some day or skynet will be born. Its always something :)

    [​IMG]
     
  11. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    Amazing things from nature - materials and biology.
    Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference...(take a guess before reading below)



    image.jpg

    Butterfly egg
     
  12. jpanhalt

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    I assume you have been to that section of the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh. Great museum, and I did not do that well on the nature vs. man-made challenges. John
     
  13. GopherT

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    Yes, I've been there a few times. Unfortunately, it was always with school tours with my kids so my pace was not mine to control.
     
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