FRequency regulator needed

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Ezra Singh, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    I designed a circuit that has a theoretical output with constantly increasing frequency. I would like to know if it is possibly to somehow regulate frequency more so keeping it controlled and even more specifically lowering it.
     
  2. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    Sure it is possible.
     
  3. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    how would you do that?
     
  4. MrChips

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    Do what???
     
  5. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    regulate the frequency
     
  6. MrChips

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    You mean output a constant frequency?
     
  7. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    yes is there some sort of IC or configuration i could use to stabilize the increasing frequency
     
  8. MrChips

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    btw - Welcome to All About Circuits, the best of its kind on the internet.
    Ask any question and you will be sure to get an answer.
    To get a proper answer ask a proper question.

    Here is an example:

    Here is a circuit that I have built to oscillate a 500kHz:

    [ the circuit diagram posted here ]

    The output is fluctuating from about 450kHz to 550kHz. I would like to keep it stable at 500kHz +/- 10kHz. How can I do this?

    This is just an example.

    I have no clue what is your situation until you tell us more.
     
  9. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    okay i will make a new thread with the actual circuit schematic thank you MrChip... its so funny how you can easily tell i am a newb
     
  10. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Don't start a new thread.

    Give us a circuit schematic. Tell us what you are attempting to do.
    Give us some numbers such as frequency.
    Frequency cannot increase for ever. It must come to a maximum at some point.
    How quickly is it rising?

    An important part of becoming an engineer is learning how to communicate effectively. We cannot read your mind or see your workbench.
    Put yourself in a stranger's shoes and see if you can understand and respond to what you have posted.
     
  11. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    I have not worked out the frequency function yet but a brief summary of the circuit (haven't drawn it out on computer yet) is a DC voltage supply powering a motor generating AC power.... the AC generator is hooked to the DC loop to add additional power to the motor and a diode is used to half rectify the output so the negative surge of AC wont cancel the DC supply. The AC generator is also supplying power to a Bridge diode full wave rectifier where the out put is connected to a inductor connected to a capacitator and a resistor in parallel hooked to ground to prevent ripples. The rectified output is then connected to the original DC loop powering the motor. The AC voltage output should continue to rise because the its gaining additional power from the AC gen itself and the rectifier which also means the torque on the motor is increasing consequently you have a constantly increasing Hz on the AC out. Again i will supply a schematic as soon as possible.
     
  12. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    Thank you MrChip i am constructing a schematic as we speak I am sorry, i will be more thorough in the future.
     
  13. MrChips

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    Sounds like a perpetual machine which is dead in its tracks.
    It would not work and this thread will be closed because discussion of perpetual machines are not allowed on this forum.
     
  14. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    oh can you explain why it would not work? I just want to my mistake, i know energy conservation but i thought heat would exchange for the voltage gain.
     
  15. MrChips

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    The energy to run the motor is coming from the DC power supply. You cannot generate more energy that what the DC power supply can provide. The motor will come to a constant speed and remain at that speed.
     
  16. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    ah what about the DC sources in series wont the rectified voltage combine with the original voltage source? Thank you.
     
  17. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    The energy from the rectified voltage is coming from the DC power supply. You can't get something from nothing.
     
  18. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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    I see thank you again
     
  19. Ezra Singh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 16, 2013
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  20. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    A gem of wisdom.

    Good!
     
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