Frequencies and Oscilloscope Range Question

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by AJMetal87, May 23, 2014.

  1. AJMetal87

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
    21
    0
    Hey guys. I have a general frequency question I think will be able to be easily answered, hopefully.

    I am working with a 5.7GHz radio transmitter/receiver. More specifically, subscriber module for cell sites for wireless internet service providers.

    I have a Tektronix TDS1002B 60MHz 1GS/s oscilloscope.

    When I am attempting to measure across any component on the board, I am not getting a waveform/signal with this particular scope. I have confirmed the scopes integrity with a function and signal generator. So I know the scope is good.

    Does the 60MHz which is printed on the scope refer to its max range? Is this why I am not getting any waveform?

    I know that the radio itself transmits and receives information over the 5.7GHz frequency - would it make sense to have every component on the board be measuring around that same frequency?

    I really hope this makes sense.

    Thank you in advance guys!
     
  2. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
    428
    yes, the 60 mhz is thescopes design limit. it may work a little higher, but you will never see anything in the 5.7 ghz frequency range. no, only the rf part of the boards will have the 5.7 ghz or other rf signals. you should be ble to see the waveforms for the modulation ok.
     
  3. AJMetal87

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
    21
    0
    what typically consists of "the RF part of the board"? i just need a rough guess of what it could be. Also, why should i see a waveform in the modulation but not the RF part, what is the difference between the 2 parts?
     
  4. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
    428
    the botom half of that board. the part with the stripline componants.
     
  5. Ragwire

    Member

    Dec 9, 2013
    36
    1
    Frequency.
    Many moons ago, when scopes typcally topped out at 5 MHz bandwidth, techs used to use a demodulator probe to track television signal through the circuitry. The demod would not show the high frequency carrier, but the scope would show the modulation of the carrier, and the waveform envelope could be seen and measured.
     
  6. Art

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 10, 2007
    785
    61
    Because a higher frequency carrier must be used than the frequency being modulated by the carrier.
     
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