flux cutting the coil

Discussion in 'General Science' started by samjesse, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. samjesse

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 14, 2008
    202
    0
    Hi

    [​IMG]
    in the image above. the permanent magnet flux will mostley travel in the right side of the core.
    when the left side is pulsed on, the permanent flux should travel the left side of the core and when it is pulsed off, the flux returns to the right side of the core.
    the movement of the flux will generate AC on the "out" coil.
    or will it?

    what core materials and construction method is best for this?

    thx
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    282
    My suspicion is that the flux in the core will partially saturate the structure and do no more than limit the total energy that can be handled.

    What is this supposed to do? How does a right/left travel of flux assist or accomplish something?
     
  3. samjesse

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Sep 14, 2008
    202
    0
    by varying the flux, an induced current will be created in the right coil.

    but, if toroidal flux is contained in the middle of the core. would it not reach the surface where the coil is? my original question.
     
  4. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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  5. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
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    Actually, there is a commercial vibrator design that works on this principle. The difference is that the magnet is allowed to move and AC is used to energize the coil(s). Result: 50 or 60 HZ vibrator. Varying the AC amplitude varies the vibration amplitude.

    Cheers, DPW [ Spent years making heaters out of op-amps.]
     
  6. t_n_k

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 6, 2009
    5,448
    782
    Putting aside issues of saturation for the moment, it would seem the presence of the permanent magnet simply serves only to provide a static flux in either side of the main magnetic path. Rather more importantly, the magnet will also act as a magnetic shunt and depending on the relative reluctance values of the two paths, may bypass a significant part of the primary flux developed by the input winding. So less primary flux would couple with the secondary [output] winding.

    If one considers the magnetic circuit to be essentially linear then I would expect the presence of the static flux would have no bearing on the the secondary behavior. However, for the reason outlined above, the "performance" of the arrangement would be seriously degraded compared to the "conventional" circuit arrangement - i.e. without the magnet.
     
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