Flowchart loop

Discussion in 'Programmer's Corner' started by Dritech, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. Dritech

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2011
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    Hi all,

    Hope this is the right section.
    When doing a loop in a flowchart, which method from the two attached should I used please?
     
  2. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    There are two methods. Method 1 is not one of them.

    Method 2 is called a REPEAT-UNTIL loop.

    If you interchange the structures you have a WHILE-DO loop.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2014
    Dritech likes this.
  3. Dritech

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2011
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    Thanks for the reply :)
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  5. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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  6. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    I've seen both conventions used in practice. Personally, I've always indicated process flowing directly to the step versus using a node (method 1). IMHO, it is less confusing. I'd say it depends on what your audience may be expecting, as neither method can be misconstrued.
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    I'm agreeing with Jpanhalt and djsfantasi.

    The responsibility of someone drawing a flowchart is to make sure there is no ambiguity where the program flow is going, and both methods do that fine, but one uses more space and is messier.

    I use the method in the microsoft example, it is smaller and neater.
     
  8. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    After further study... Unfortunately, I no longer have access to current ISO or NCCLS/CLSI (roughly an American equivalent for clinical sciences) standards. Nevertheless, here are examples of those standards that allow multiple inputs to a process.

    Source: http://isoforlab.com/phocadownload/csli/GP26-A3.pdf
    Capture.PNG

    Source:
    http://leanman.hubpages.com/hub/ISO-9001-Procedures#slide3797247
    Capture1.PNG

    There are even examples of multiple inputs to decisions (diamond). It is my understanding that a process can have just one output and any number of inputs. A decision has just two outputs (yes/no; positive/negative; etc.). There is no specification for number of inputs; although, in my experience, I have rarely seen more than two inputs.

    John
     
  9. atferrari

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    Jan 6, 2004
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    If the box in No. 1 is actually composed of more than one "step" I will find it confusing. Just by breaking it in the steps it is formed by, you expose the nodes (access or entry points).

    I tend to think that better you always return, GOTO or whatever to the entry point of the next step as in No. 2.
     
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