Flat Flex and connector

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by darenw5, Sep 12, 2009.

  1. darenw5

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Feb 2, 2008
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    I'm trying to reconnect a flat flex cable into its connector. There's a plastic locking part but with my giant fingers, I haven't figured out how to get the darn thing in and make a solid connection. What is the trick to doing this? Is some special tool needed? Trained fleas?
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    The cable is about 8mm wide.

    A photo from before i messed with it:
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    Last edited: Sep 12, 2009
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
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    My guess would be that you first slide the black plastic piece over the flat-flex cable. This black piece is polarized so that it is important that it be placed in the correct orientation over the flat-flex cable. With the black piece slide back and out of the way, you insert the flat-flex cable into the white connector. Then you slide the black piece down the flat-flex cable toward the white connector and it should lock into the white piece if the orientation is correct.

    hgmjr
     
  3. darenw5

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Feb 2, 2008
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    I had been trying that and other ways. It looks simple, and from the "before" photo I could get the right orientation. These parts are tiny and my fingers might as well be cucumbers (mmm, salad...)

    The best way has worked out to be putting the cable in first, just letting it sit loosely, then slide the black bit on. The edge with the tiny holes slides between the cable and the upper contacts in the socket. Thirty times in a row, the black piece will twist upward , even with a screwdriver or other tool guiding it, with that edge slipping over the socket. Or it may roll over the opposite way, not fitting in at all. But trying again and again, I managed to get lucky once with it sliding in as it should. Then after another thirty or so attempts got the other cable in, too.
     
  4. darenw5

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Feb 2, 2008
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    So now I'm wondering how they deal with these connectors at the factory where some worker needs to do hundreds of these in a day, each in just a few seconds? I guess the Chinese have some pretty smart and strong trained fleas.
     
  5. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Also the hourly wage is probably low enough that they can afford to put enough individual workers on the line to get the production rate up to the desired count.

    hgmjr
     
  6. rjenkins

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 6, 2005
    1,015
    69
    I've not seen one where the locking tab comes completely out.

    Usually, you pull it forward just 1 or 2 mm by the ears on the end, and that unlocks the cable. Refit the cable and push both ears back in toward the body to lock it.
     
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,536
    Find a woman with tiny fingers?
     
  8. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    looks like the retainers are on the ends that'll snap into the shells. Make sure they haven't broken off when taking it apart.

    I'd lay the cable in place, lay the black piece on top, then pull it into place with a plier. Should be firm but without much force.
     
  9. darenw5

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Feb 2, 2008
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    rjenkins: yes most FFC connecters i've seen, even elsewhere in this TV, have the locking tabs that stay attached. The wider cable you see in one of the photos had a normal connecter and locking tab. These two 8mm-wide ones appear to be some new special-cheap version. I did initially pull them out carefully, expecting them to stop after 2-3mm but they didn't.

    Luckily they did go back in after numerous attempts, so if anyone else encounters this kind of connector, there's hope! The trick was to push while holding them at exactly the right angle, getting the one edge with the holes to slide under the upper row of pins in the socket. I used fingertips and a flat screwdriver.
     
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