FE/EIT Exam Topics..

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by mwalden824, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. mwalden824

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 6, 2011
    I will be taking this test probably next Fall sometime. I picked up a "Supplied Reference Manual" from my University the other day and I was looking through the different topics that are on this exam. As far as the Electrical Engineering section goes, which would be the second half of the test, I should be okay. I mean I will have taken all the necessary classes covered by the section by the time I take the test. But on the "General Engineering" section, which is the first half of the test, there are topics that are on this section which are not required for my degree at the University I attend. In particular, Fluids, Statics, Dynamics, Strength of Materials, and Material Properties.

    Now I thought maybe they are just covering basic stuff that would have been gone over in Physics 101 and 102. But I bought a book with example test questions from the general section and they go much deeper into these subjects than what a intro physics class would do. I'm guessing they assume at all Universities these topics are covered for all engineers?

    So my question is should I take these courses also? Or maybe just buy the books and read through them in my spare time? I don't understand why they test us on this if we are not required to take the classes (or at least we aren't at my University for a degree in EE)?

  2. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
    Most exams have a few general life questions in the area of the subject.
    A good thing you read the book,now you have a heads up on how test
    are given. Take fuilds,robotics need fuilds to move cylinders,basis fuilds
    a floor jack is manual fuilds,a power take off need a motor. You have
    controllers on robots.......see where I'm going.
  3. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    If you are going to take a particular examination, then you need to attend to all the subjects covered. If you are sitting a general entrance examination, it should be no surprise if its requirements are not precisely tailored to what you think will be required by the course you will finally be following. There are several reasons for saying this:-

    • Your assessment of the knowledge which would be required for your chosen course may not be accurate.
    • It may be impractical to offer nuanced examinations for entry to many broadly similar courses.
    • The examiners may require a certain breadth of knowledge, extending outside the subjects to be taken further.
    • Some examinations are intended partly to assess the ability to learn, not simply to measure what has been learned.
    • Not everybody continues to concentrate on the same subjects originally chosen to the end of their studies.
    For these reasons, and others I may not have thought of, I think you should cover the syllabus as fully as you reasonably can. Complaining about the design of the examination won't cut any ice if you don't pass.
  4. Zazoo


    Jul 27, 2011
    Michael, I'm in the same situation as you, I'm an EE planning to take the FE this spring.

    My solution has been to find some mechanical engineering, chemical engineering and bio-engineering students in my local area and put together a study group for the FE. When studying a particular area of the exam, one of us can tutor the others in any area where we have more experience.
  5. mwalden824

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 6, 2011
    Adjuster - I don't mind learning the extra material, as long as I have enough time to do so. I just found out that I have a lot more to do and I am already taking 8 classes next semester, and 3 during the summer. There's really no way I can take the classes, now that I think about it, so I am going to have to buy the books.

    I am actually very interested in these particular subjects. The only thing I was really "complaining" about was the fact that we were never told of this and I am just finding out. Now I have a lot to cram in these next few months. If I were told, then I would have also registered for all of these classes over the last couple of years and fit it in there. Unfortunately now I neither have the time nor the extra money to do so.

    -Zazoo - That's a great idea, I will try to find or put together a group this upcoming semester. There are a lot of really good books for the FE exam also. But most I have found only deal with the general section. Do you know of any good ones that deal with the EE section specifically? I know there are some.

    Thanks you all for your help,
  6. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
    Exam question

    Did you you learn anything from Loosewire's post about life
    D. all of the above *
  7. nweil

    New Member

    Jan 19, 2012
    I'm a EE as well and I just took (and passed :)) the exam Fall 2011. I reviewed using Lindeburg's FE Review Manual and definitely recommend that book. Studying with other students is also very helpful. My school didn't offer a review course so I didn't do that. I wrote a lot about my experience on my blog:

    General tips:http://nickweil.blogspot.com/2012/01/fundamentals-of-engineeringeit-exam.html

    Strategy: http://nickweil.blogspot.com/2012/01/fundamentals-of-engineeringeit-exam_18.html

    Good luck!
    Zazoo likes this.
  8. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
    Did you have to have an oral review board for membership.

    That another way they use to select the best.
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  9. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011

    We always learn something from you Loosewire!:)
    loosewire likes this.