F1100H Oscillator

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by CVMichael, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. CVMichael

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Aug 3, 2007
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    I bought an oscillator: F1100H 40.00000Mhz

    I don't know what pins are what... I'm used to 2 pin oscillators, but this one has 4 pins...

    I want to use it with a microcontroller, but in the diagram for microcontroller it shows only 2 pin oscillator, so how can I use this one ?
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    When you look at the datasheet, you can see it needs gnd , + 5 Volts and has an output.

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
  3. CVMichael

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Aug 3, 2007
    416
    17
    Thanks, I looked at the datasheet but I did not see it before, they should write that a little bigger !

    Anyways...

    How do I connect that to the microcontroller ?

    The microcontroller has an CLKIN and a CLKOUT, but the oscillator has only one output... so does that get connect to CLKIN of the microcontroller or the CLKOUT ? and what happens to the other connection of the microcontroller ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2008
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Generally all you should need to do is connect the output of the oscillator to the CLKIN. If you look at the manufacturer's datasheet for the microcontroller it will tell you the proper method.

    hgmjr
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I hope that your microcontroller is capable of being clocked at that speed. If not, you will soon have a new paperweight.

    Which microcontroller are you working with?
     
  6. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    If the 40 megahertz device is too fast for the processor you are using then consider a flip/flop to divide it by 2 and then you will have a 20 Megahertz clock that should work OK.

    hgmjr
     
  7. CVMichael

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Aug 3, 2007
    416
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    I plan to use it with any of:
    PIC16C55A - 40MHz
    or
    PIC18F44K20 - up to 64MHz
     
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    You should be good to go then.

    hgmjr
     
  9. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Make sure to place the oscillator as near to the processor as you can so that the interconnect line is short. If you are laying out the PC board you would do well to include a ground plane.

    hgmjr
     
  10. CVMichael

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Aug 3, 2007
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    What is a "ground plane" ?

    Also, I have another question:

    I have only one 20MHz oscillator but I already use it in another board, can I use a 24MHz oscillator with a PIC16F877 ?

    I believe the term is Overclocking

    So, is it possible to overclock a PIC16F877 to 24MHz ?
     
  11. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    If you venture into overclocking territory, you are on your own. When the device misbehaves, you will not be able to easily determine if it is because of the overclocking or something simple.

    It is always best to operate a device within the manufacturer's guidelines in all respects.

    hgmjr
     
  12. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Adding to hgmjr's words of truth and wisdom,

    The faster you clock a digital device, the more time it spends in the transition state (ie: linear region). The transition state is where the most heat is generated due to the power dissipation. If you were to attempt such an idea, you must make provisions to carry away the extra heat that will be generated, or the life expectancy of the device will be greatly reduced.

    The higher in frequency you go, the more carefully you must plan your circuit board layout.

    A "ground plane" is a large area of the circuit board to which electrical ground is connected. It's a common point for sinking current and connecting Vcc/Vdd/Vee bypass capacitors of components. Bypass capacitors help to ensure a noise-free supply to each IC.
     
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