Exceed Amp!

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by moorejohn90, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. moorejohn90

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2011
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    0
    Hi allaboutcircuit members,
    What happen if the current is supply more than require to the load?:confused:
    Is it also right, the load will be damage if the supply Voltage is more than require.
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
    2,347
    Hello,

    Do you mean thet the load require more current than the powersupply can deliver?
    It depends on the powersupply what happens.
    If the powersupply is NOT current limited, it will probably burn.
    If the powersupply IS current limited, it will limit the current to protect itself.

    If you put more voltage on a device than it is designed for, it will most probably go defective and it might even burn.

    Bertus
     
  3. moorejohn90

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2011
    57
    0
    Hi bertus, Thank for your reply, No, Let talk about with following example.

    The load(motor or relay) with require 1A. What happen if I supply 2 A.

    John
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,648
    2,347
    Hello,

    If the powersupply can deliver 2 Amperes and you have a load of 1 Ampere,
    the powersupply will only give the 1 Ampere.
    The powersupply will deliver what is needed.

    Bertus
     
  5. moorejohn90

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 9, 2011
    57
    0
    Hi bertus, Thaks you.
     
  6. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
    300
    The most common types of power supply are constant-voltage. This means that the output voltage does not change much for different load currents, at least for currents less than some maximum value. This means that the load usually determines the current, not the supply.

    It is less usual for the power supply to control current by itself. "Constant-current" power supplies do exist, which can deliver a fixed current output as long as the voltage remains below some limit value. This may be a feature to protect against overload, or for some other purpose such as charging batteries.
     
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