Evolution of my Crystal Radio!

Discussion in 'Wireless & RF Design' started by vu2nan, Sep 16, 2014.

  1. vu2nan

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 11, 2014
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  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,494
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    My first was a Cats Whisker version, lump of Galena that had to be 'tickled' with the whisker.
    Max.
     
  3. myamiphil

    New Member

    Jul 18, 2014
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    I heard from a podcast (Soldersmoke) where a piece of Fools Gold (Iron Pyrite) performed better than Galena. I finally got a piece, so it will be my foray into the whisker radio I will make sometime in the future. A diode (1N34 performs even better, but its not the purist design...
     
  4. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    the razor blade should be a "blue blade" type, preferably a little rusty. there are several comparisons of different minerals used in detectors, as well as different type of detector diode materials on line. for instance a shotkey diode with a little bias works well, and a slightly corroded piece of galvanised tin works well too.,
     
  5. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    it has been years since I have seen a "blue blade" in a store, a posable source is behind bathroom medacine chest/mirrors, the kind with the slot to dispose of razor blades in.
    have you tried anything with negative resistance? there were several projects on a site I used to go to, now locked out at work for me, something like "spark, buzz, bang" or something like that.
     
  6. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    3,577
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    so much Nostalgia! I have sold quite a few TA7642 AM Radio ICs.

    Are there still AM radio stations?
     
  7. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    try a copper wire and an iron wire in contact and heated, they will have more output than two copper wires.
     
  8. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
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    There is a website called sci-toys.com that will be sure to have some interesting reads for ultra-simple radio circuits that work pretty good. I make a batteryless receiver that has been rocking steady for over a year now. Not bad at all.
     
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