European voltage?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by mbohuntr, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. mbohuntr

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    I'm looking at a dewalt cordless tool, and the charger has a european style plug on it... Question... Is the power supply for the charger a standard construction and unaffected by our 60 hz? It still converts to DC and has smoothing caps and a voltage reg ...right? It still has to run to 18+volts to charge....I was thinking of cutting the plug off and soldering on a normal one.
     
  2. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
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    Does it say 50/60 Hz and 110/220VAC on its label?
     
  3. mbohuntr

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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  4. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    It is not likely to work properly on 120VAC regardless of frequency. The new plug would have to fit a 240V outlet.
     
  5. mbohuntr

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    I can wire for 220 i think, Garage is wired for it, I wonder about the fraquency and current?
     
  6. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    The charger will only draw as much current as it needs - probably an Amp. (My 120VAC DeWalt 18V charger claims to draw 2 Amps.)

    The higher frequency should not matter.
     
  7. mbohuntr

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    Correct me if i'm wrong, The line voltage in a 220 receptacle origionally came from a single center tapped transformer coil, so joining the 110 leads on the whip will return it to 220(no phase issues...)? Or do they pull 110 from different phases at the pole? A little out of my depth here, so caution is advised...:rolleyes:
     
  8. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
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    Actually, the frequency does matter.

    If you connect a 50Hz transformer to a 60Hz network it will output less voltage than when connected to 50Hz. However, if you connect a 60Hz one to a 50Hz network it will output a greater voltage than when connected to 60Hz.

    Also, the smoothing capacitors are for a given frequency and thus the ripple voltage increases/decreases.
     
  9. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    Smoothing won't be an issue here, since the charger o/p would be made more smooth.

    Voltage falloff should not make any difference in this application.

    Core size is also more than needed for 60Hz, although going the other way might have been problematic.
     
  10. leftyretro

    Active Member

    Nov 25, 2008
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    It's called split phase, and yes you use the two 110 hot leads to realize 220 single phase power.
    Lefty
     
  11. mbohuntr

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    Thank-you all, I may throw a lowball bid in and see what happens, the worst is I will fry the charger and have to buy a American one... Thanks all again.!!! I feel like Smurk...Illuminated!!:D I take it there is no neutral anymore, and I will ground to the frame on the charger??? The European plug only has 2 prongs, I assume one will become ground?
     
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