Estimation Skills - Question 2

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by GopherT, Mar 21, 2016.

What is the average value of a pickup truck load of mixed sheet metal - from a scrap metal yard mgr

Poll closed Mar 28, 2016.
  1. 0 - $10

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. $10 - $30

    6 vote(s)
    24.0%
  3. $30 - $100

    8 vote(s)
    32.0%
  4. $100 - $300

    10 vote(s)
    40.0%
  5. $300 - $1000

    1 vote(s)
    4.0%
  1. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Again, estimation is lost art. What is your best guess based on gut feel.

    NOTE: no big items like transformers, motors, anvils, ...
    Just sheet metal from appliances, screen doors, auto parts, patio furniture - crushed/folded as best as a person can without power equipment.
     
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  2. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    For the record my guess is item #4 (i.e. $100 - $300)

    Best regards
    HP
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    The last time I did this with a minivan the result was less than $100 but that's not your "average" truck.
    So I thought about a pick-up truck. @ $12/hundred weight you could get over $100 in a half ton truck with no roof on top, so I choose $100 to $300.

    I'm not that good with light years.:D
     
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  4. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    I haul scrap metals all the time so this is a no-brainer for me. B.

    Scrap sheeting is 'fluffy' so it has a low weight to volume ratio plus scrap yards love to classify it as tin being it has a high paint/nonrecyclable material content to metal weight ratio thus they cheat you down on the value per ton from that.

    It's not worth nothing but they try to get as close to it as they can get away with.

    So given that say good #2 prepared scrap iron/steel is at $100 - $120 a ton a full-size pickup box full of sheeting from appliances and home scrap would be maybe 500 - 800 #'s, if you are really good at packing it in, and it's typically considered the lowest grade of scrap iron/steel which tend to run about half to two-thirds the price of good #2 prepared so from that you are looking at 'B - $10 -$30' being the typical expectable range you will get for it.

    Now if you really want to get kicked in the nuts on scrap metal try bringing in old welder power supplies that are built with all copper clad aluminum windings and connections. Heavy as heck but worth absolutely zero due to the work it take to separate everything into any degree of individual recyclable metals.

    Seriously they would pay you more for a load of field stone than those things. $0 - $10 per ton value.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2016
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    That's less than half the price I get around here, and I'm not guessing. The price list is stuck to my refrigerator with a magnet.
     
  6. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Depending on where you are in relation to the smelter or international scrap metals shipping dock has a huge amount do with the pricing as well which puts a somewhat undefinable curve on the whole estimation question.

    Right now around here good clean #2 prepared might get you $40 a ton. Two summers ago it was $120 - $180 a ton.:(
     
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  7. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
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    I voted in the range of $100 to $300 dlls... good thing about scrap metal, is that its price is quite uniform in most countries.
     
  8. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    The last time I checked (a couple months ago) the recyclers around here would take your iron/tin/steel scrap off your hands but wouldn't pay anything for it. If they paid five cents a pound and I got a ton of it in the truck that would be $100. So I went with the $10 to $30 range.
     
  9. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Now I'm confused!?!?:confused: -- Around here non-magnetic sheet 'steel' 'fetches' $820/Ton --- (I know because that's the reason I can dispose of it free of charge -- including disassembly, loading, and hauling!:cool:) --- So... Apparently there is major price variation across 'grades'?

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  10. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    Non-magnetic sheet steel (such as 316 stainless steel) is very different than scap iron/tin/steel.

    There are lots of different categories and hugely varying prices. Drive up with a ton of shiny copper wire and they will have to call Brinks to bring your payment.

    Here's the current list for Golden Recycling. Look at the very bottom.

    http://selectlaundry.biz:81/CommodityPrices/Pricelist.aspx?BID=2

    That shiny copper wire is over $3500/ton. They don't break out stainless, but I know from past experience that, around here, it is usually noticeably higher. We don't have any smelters and such around here that I know of, so our scrap prices are probably lower than much of the country.
     
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  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I wish you were close enough to hire me for that job. That's a week of my income per load.:eek:
     
  12. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    Jeeez! That's a lot of work for the money!:eek: 24 trips (Plus cutting and loading) for a scant $20K gross?!?! --- I don't know why folks are willing to come that low -- 'tho I'm glad they do!:) ---- Manual labor just ain't my 'cup of tea' --- If that makes me lazy then I plead 'guilty as charged'!:rolleyes::D

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  13. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I would haul 2 loads a day for $400 a load and come back tomorrow!

    Should I bring show shoes?:eek:
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2016
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  14. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

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    It must be pure bliss to be so easily pleased! --- Seriously, I can't imagine it!!!:eek::eek::eek: --- Still, from a practical standpoint, I suppose it compares favorably to "bobbing for iffy tubes"!:(:eek::D

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  15. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    When your business partner drops dead and you're past retirement age, 20 grand looks like a big number.
     
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  16. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Cripes seriously? What kind of work do you do where $20K ain't worth some manual labor? o_O
    $20K will pay close to 3 years of my base living expenses.

    Just tell me where the scrap is and I will be there with semi and I will fly #12 in from Florida myself.
     
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  17. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    I hear ya @#12:( --- It's merely that 24 tons 'looks like' a much, much, larger 'number':eek:

    Best regards
    HP
     
  18. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Cast my vote already.

    Not to derail the guessing game here but my close experience as Ch. Officer with (iron) scrap was loading our vessel full of (finely shredded, they said) iron scrap in the Mississippi river, near Fina Anchorage, from barges which prior coming alongside had to pass under a shower to wet their cargo (otherwise the resulting dust could cover the vessel rather quickly).

    The scrap is loaded with kind of a "grab" formed by five or six "fingers". To release the load, the grab is opened quite close to the hold's bottom, precisely to avoid dust.

    Prior sailing, shippers recommended to avoid going into holds with covers closed because of the intense oxidation process that could reduce the oxygen tenor inside.

    Freight paid is very low, so usually, vessels in that trade are not in their best shape. No surprise that when we were about to complete the loading, one of the guys told me: "Chief, when you discharge your cargo in Brazil, put also your vessel in the pile". Yes, she was very old and looked like scrap but my family and me lived from my job there for maybe 2 years.
     
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  19. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    The scrap collectors 'invested' ten days hard labor equipped with acetylene torches, 'porta-powers' a 'Serco loader', miscellaneous 'manual implements' and a single F-450 -- all for a paltry $1K apiece per day (prior to expenses/taxes, etc...) --- That anyone could regard such an outlay of blood, sweat and expletives --for so derisory a sum-- as 'equitable' is hopelessly beyond all comprehension!:confused::confused::confused: --- How truly "one person's trash is another's treasure" -- A good thing too - considering such is the basis of an economy!:cool:

    Tennis, rock climbing, xc and dh skiing, sailing and, occasionally, diving constitute my 'nodding acquaintance' with 'manual labor' -- Of course, as is the nature of recreation, said activities are uncompensated -- 'Tho I've high hopes that'll change Re: the latter:):):):D

    Actually, I don't consider myself 'lazy' -- I'm merely one of those 'old fashioned types' who feels time is more important than money:)

    Very best regards
    HP:)
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2016
  20. GopherT

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Paultry $1k/day? It is not likely that that money was split equally. The skilled manual laborors (took in $12 to $20/hour) and the unskilled likely 7.25 to $10. If the average you calculated was $1000/day (125/hour) the owner/manager of a squad four was pulling in a healthy sum by the end of the fortnight, he has an interesting business and his employees have a bit of food on their plates but rent will have to be paid with income from their second job.
     
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