engineered continuous wave signal source at the ISM frequency of 13.56Mhz.

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by musclemania05, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. musclemania05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    A engineered continuous wave signal source at the ISM frequency of 13.56Mhz. This will be for a closed (non-signal radiating) application. Power level of at least 10 watts into a 50 ohm non reactive load. Harmonic performance is not specified. The restriction requiring only a 12 volt power source does not apply to this project.
    NOTE: the maximum input to the spectrum is 1 watt so you must use an appropriate RF WATTMETER and dummy load.

    Need help with design process
    • block diagram
    • schematic with simulation
    • parts
    • detailed explanation
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I don't know what passes for a requirements specification where you come from, but the content of your post is just really bizarre. Instead of regurgitating some gobbledegook you don't understand, why don't you start with why you think those particular requirements are relevant to your ultimate purpose.

    Why don't we start with how you want to power this thing.
     
  3. musclemania05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    hello thanks for reply this is a project from my professor really didn't give me much to go on but what I'm thinking this is, is some kind of rf transmitter and I plan on power using like 9v batteries
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    OK, that might explain your difficulty.
    Let's start with some basics. If I have a 9V battery and I want to extract 10 watts of power from it how much current would the 9V battery have to deliver to a load for 10 watts to be consumed? How long do you think a 9V battery could supply that amount of current before it was completely drained? As the battery discharges and the voltage drops what will happen to the required current to maintain the 10 watt power level?

    If you are looking at the same battery datasheets that I am looking at it won't be very long. So what would your next best power supply choice be?
     
  5. musclemania05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    look I don't know how to approach this problem that's why posted it I'm new to RF circuits so what I am looking for is what will I be need to design something like this, maybe a schematic or something cause I was assigned this project and have little knowledge of it. I don't know what would be a good power source, I just said a battery, if you or someone can please break down this project or how would they approach it would be awesome
     
  6. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    Fail
     
  7. musclemania05

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    look if you don't got nothing to say that helpful stay off my post
     
  8. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    Welcome to Allaboutcircuits.com.

    Papaguido is trying to help you get started.

    As with most kinds of circuits RF amplifiers can be very complicated so you might not find the complete how-to on a forum like this, but you will be able to get help along the way toward finishing your project.

    Your description of your project is a good start, but you need to make a lot of decision to narrow down the many design options.

    One thing you might try is to survey the internet to see how others have approached the problem. 13.56 MHz amplifiers are all over the web.

    This is a link to a Google Search to get you started

    This presentation from the University of Florida highlighting the issues in a MOSFET amplifier popped up on both Google and Bing searches and offers some insight:
    High-Power High-Efficiency GaN 13.56 MHz Class-E Power Amplifier
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2016
  9. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,144
    1,790
    Many engineering projects are started by people who know very little about the subject matter. They learn what they need to know instead of asking someone else to do their work for them. It might seem like a shortcut, but you are actually short changing yourself. Even if someone gave you a schematic, and you built it, and it didn't meet the professor's requirements, you would not be in a very good position to fix it. If I were you I would start learning everything I could so that at least I would have something of my own to show for it. You may take any number of other paths, but you should expect to get as much as you deserve. That is how engineering is done, I don't know any other way. I can't be responsible for giving you something that won't meet the requirements.

    You might start by learning about oscillators, like Colpitts, Hartley, Clapp, and Pierce.
     
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