Embedded Systems Help

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by E-MotionRichard, Aug 29, 2014.

  1. E-MotionRichard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 26, 2014
    7
    0
    Well, The reason for this post is to try and get some preparation ahead of time for my next and final term in my Bachelors program. One of my final classes, besides my Capstone Project, is Embedded Systems. Class starts on September 15, and I want to get a head start to try to pull my grades back up. I had a 3.7 GPA, until my last couple of terms, when some personal matters caused me to fall behind and get some not so good grades in a couple classes that I should have done much better in. So, any pointers on what to expect, and preparation for an Embedded Systems class would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    Richard
     
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
    675
    Which kind of embedded systems? Do you have a course description? Will you be using FPGAs? Microcontrollers? Both?

    There are many avenues the course could take...
     
  3. cl10Greg

    Active Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    49
    0
    Start reading through microcontroller datasheets and get a list of questions and vocabulary going. Such as, How do I do a PWM? What is the clock speed? How do I set the clock speed? Then start working through the answers.
     
  4. E-MotionRichard

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 26, 2014
    7
    0
    Thanks for your suggestions. The course description does not say a whole lot, just "emphasis on effective programming, interfacing, and implementing a microcontroller. Greg, I will do what you said though about reading through microcontroller datasheets and getting list of questions and vocabulary going.
     
  5. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
    3,531
    675
    Given the description provided, I'd second what cl10Greg suggested.

    Find out which part(s) your department uses (e.g. PIC18F4322, ATMEGA328, MSP430x, etc.) and look at the relevant datasheets, noting the different hardware modules associated with the part.

    Once you know what the modules are, look up what they mean/do and how to use them.

    Buy the part and programmer. Breadboard a circuit and test the functions of the device. Make sure to keep your code.

    Edit: I'd recommend paying particular attention to the SPI, ADC, and PWM capabilities of the device.
     
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