Electronics Engineer Needed.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by mech3dtech, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. mech3dtech

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2012
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    I am a mechanical engineer and I an working on a project where I need the support of an electrical engineer to create the schematic, parts list and layout based on written/verbal design guidelines.

    Someone with DSP and audio experience would be preferred since the device manipulates musical signals.

    I am not sure if this is the place to ask this question, but if there is someone out there who has the experience, expertise and trustworthyness to work remotely. Please let me know so I can start a dialog to discuss the project details and compensation.

    Thank,
    Joe C.
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Over the last six years I have seen numerous requests of this type. I am not aware that even a single one of them had a positive outcome. Most projects suffer from a lack of clear requirements and specifications. They also suffer from a distorted notion of the time and effort required along with the appropriate compensation. For all I know this one might be different. If it is you'll have to let us know.

    BTW I charge $125.00/hr for consulting and design like this and I've got customers lined up outside my door.

    Search the threads and tell me I'm wrong.
     
  3. mech3dtech

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 19, 2012
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    I have no reason not to believe you because I know you are correct. All I can say is that I have been in mechanical engineering for 30 years and have been on many, many electronics projects in both military and commercial environments, so I know quite well what's involved with the design process, scheduling and cost.

    I have a company's backing financially but we but lack the technical skills for this project. So this leads me here. Being that there is a line of people waiting for your services, I am not sure what to do.
     
  4. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
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    I have 6 years experience all my own dev kits and experience in wireless desings, UI charge $45 no taxes indy contractor.Most of my experience comes from the medical field. If you'd like to discuss it further pm me and we can talk.
     
  5. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    Care to share some of your marketing secrets? I'm getting really tired of making other people rich.
     
  6. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    mech3dtech, personal "consultations" may cost you, but if you have any specific questions you'd like to ask here on the forums, I'm sure there are dozens of people who would be happy to help you free of charge. They might not be able/willing to do the whole project for you, but if you break it up into pieces and give enough information, you might get the assistance you desire. Here on the forums we generally answer specific questions, not "hire on" for a full project. However, it appears that there are some members here who are willing to, so the choice is up to you :)

    I wish you the best of luck!
    Regards,
    Der Strom
     
  7. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    I charge $300/h. On AAC advice is pro bono.
     
  8. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    So, what does one of your classes cost?
     
  9. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    I do it for £20 an hour...

    I'll then come on here and ask for you guys to help me design something that manipulates audio signals. For hobby reasons of course. Really.



    Why are you all looking at me like that? :p
     
  10. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    There really are no marketing secrets. You just consistently deliver superior results and the word gets around.
     
  11. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Word of Mouth advertising has a much higher return than all other forms. Naturally you earn that by having satisified customers, those who receive superior service. That includes early or on-time delivery of whatever they hired you to do.

    With social media (facebook, linkedin, tweeting, et al) entering into the picture these days, as well as Angie's List and other websites, word of mouth tends to reach more people. The downside would be relying on "false" testimonials on the websites.

    All your paid marketing events should be measurable. In alot of the cases it's dollars out (marketing) versus income (from marketing). My own experience is not too hot in the marketing arena. When I moved to MI, I placed an ad in one of those free weekly magazines that had a reported distribution of about 10000. I got two calls from those ads ... not income, but telephone calls. The first one was asking if I would like to purchase "advertising space" on a telephone book cover. Ok, so there's another high distribution event sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. So I bit. The next call I got was from someone who makes those placemats for diners and asked if I wanted to advertise with them. I declined because for the life of me I don't know anyone who reads those placemats let alone buy from them. Since I was ingnorant on that, I started reading them when I went took my wife to breakfast. I think I made the right decision.

    So far those two types of advertising were a bust. I had asked someone who paid over 800 per year on a yellow page ad what their rate of return was ... and they didn't have a clue.

    I've talked to marketing people and other managers concerning the rate of return on marketing events that they advocated. I seriously doubt they could put a dollar amount to their efforts.

    I would love to hear of some marketing events that were successful ... from a cost/benefit analysis.

    Word of mouth still remains king. How that word gets out is immaterial as the personal recommendation is the value.

    I wish all the present and future business owners here the best in their endeavors.
     
  12. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    That assumes that a business has had customers. It's completely usless for a startup.

    The only way I know of to actually start a consulting firm is to make your employer your first client. Blah! One reason I want to consult it to get away from my current employer.

    PS, on further thought, considering my people skills, I'm probably better off just being an employee.
     
  13. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I have often turned my employers into clients or benefactors. I have also gone the other way and been an employee after being a consultant. If you treat everyone like a customer, all the time, including employers you cannot stand, you cannot fail to profit. I certainly have.

    Also I never, ever say no to a customer request. If I want to say no, however, I set the price in such a way that "thanks, but no thanks" is the expected answer. If I do want the job, I set the price at a competitive level.
     
  14. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    You have friends and family that know what you do ... and you probably have provided them services for "free". There are other organizations that you belong to that also know of whatever skills you have told them about.

    Startup's struggle, no doubt. But most ventures start as part time, building their client base.

    Sure you can get your name out there with lots of advertising, but you are limited to whatever you budgeted or have funds to do.

    Handing out business cards is marketing.

    Very true.
     
  15. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I agree that starting up a business is a struggle. My first consulting job was with a former employer three years after I had left on good terms for the SECOND time. I bent over backwards to avoid burning any bridges although there would have been immense psychic gratification in doing so. That was in 1979 and I have not looked back.

    You build your business one client and one opportunity at a time. You expect and require clear requirements, you document the deliverables in writing, and you make sure the customer is happy with the result. In the rare cases where that doesn't happen, I make it right at no additional charge.

    What makes customers really happy is the FFP (Firm Fixed Price) contract. You have to be right about the time and effort more often than not for this approach to pay off.
     
  16. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Once again PapaBravo gives sound advice.

    If your a history channel buff, watch American Restoration. Very rarely does Rick deviate from his price and if he thinks there will be deviation, he allows for that by specifying parts are extra charges.

    The crew at American Restoration does outstanding work and I'm sure that show had brought them more business.

    American Restoration is a spinoff of Pawn Stars as Rick's shop was featured on many episodes of Pawn Stars.

    The only people that got breaks that I've seen on that show was the Train Museum, the Clark County Museum, and the one item they restored for auction at a breast cancer awareness event that Rick's girlfriend wanted to donate.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2012
  17. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I have that kind of relationship with my clients in my business ( real estate ) but i've never had that kind of relationship with my employer. Mostly because my employers have been idiots. In my present job every other engineer has walked off the job. I'm the only one left! The only reason I'm still there is because the market is terrible in my town right now.

    I don't think I can make this employer a client. Now, I'll have to get another job, work there for years and then try again.
     
  18. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    Except that you're currently sitting on a pat hand. I'd go all in if I was you.
     
  19. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    I'd like to start my own business selling electronic goods for bagpipes, but it's very hard to know where to begin. :(
     
  20. Dawud Beale

    Member

    Feb 10, 2012
    275
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    could you explain a bit more about the spec of the design so we can know if we are at a suitable level to provide you what you need?
     
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