Electronics basic

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by satheesh_BE, Aug 27, 2014.

  1. satheesh_BE

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2014
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    what is hole?can you tell me how too is created
     
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    A hole, in the semiconductor physics arena, is, simply enough, an absence of an electron, typically viewed as a positive charge carrier. A hole is not an actual, physical object, but thinking about it and treating it as such provides a useful way to represent the internal workings of semiconductor physics.

    The eBook has more information for you.

    See the dictionary definition #3.
     
  3. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    Positive charge particle.
     
  4. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    A hole is not a particle of any sort. It is assigned the role of a positive charge carrier and treated like a particle with a lower mobility than that of an electron, but a particle it is not.
     
  5. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    You are right. I was thinking what to use for the noun and the best I could think of was particle. But you are right. Carrier is the better/more correct(?) term.
     
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  6. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Calling it a carrier is a bit of a misnomer as well - nothing is being carried - but in regards to a hole, it is treated as such.

    The hole, being an absence of an electron, allows an electron to fill it (annihilating the hole), that electron, having come from elsewhere in the lattice, creates another hole when it leaves. As the process continues, the holes are generated in such a way that it seems to move. This motion is against the direction of electron movement and a hole is considered mobile as a result (taking the series of hole generations and annihilations and representing it as a single hole).

    For most intents and purposes, it is regarded as a positive charge carrier.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2014
  7. Fibonacci

    New Member

    May 23, 2014
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    In the theory of semiconductors, for example, in silicon (Si), the atoms come together to form a crystal lattice, and the valence electrons occupy an energy band, named valence band. These electrons are bound to the silicon atoms by covalent bonding at T = 0º K. If the temperature increases, the valence electrons may gain thermal energy. Any such electron may gain enough thermal energy to break the covalent bond and move away from its original position. The net charge in a semiconductor is zero; that is the semiconductor is neutral. If a negatively charged electron breaks its covalent bond and moves away from its original position, a positively charged "empty" state is created at that position. This positive charged "particle" is called a hole. In semiconductors, then, two types of charged particles contribuite to the current: the negatively charged free electron, and the positively charged hole.
     
  8. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Funny, I was going to respond and say it's what you get when you grab a shovel and start digging.... :D

    The OP was extremely vague.
     
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