Electronic Work Bench

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Umer_Farooq, May 11, 2010.

  1. Umer_Farooq

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 6, 2010
    104
    3
    Can any one help me that (national instrument electronic workbench) Software usefull or not
    any circuit make it the is 100% equal to designed hardware
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
    312
    No. There are NO simulation programs that run 100% like real world components.

    It is useful for standard bug checking and proof of concept, but a little wire in simulation can handle unlimited voltage and current, parts will not blow up in simulation, but they will in real life.
     
  3. Umer_Farooq

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 6, 2010
    104
    3
    please tell me any electronic software that is equal to real mean good software
    tell me about Proteus software
     
  4. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
    312
    LTSpice is a good, free software.

    Proteus, I know nothing about.

    TI TINA, is another free, and good software.

    I use LTSpice because thats what my favorite Wookie uses.

    LTSpice has a YahooGroup that is very active and has dozens of component models.

    Get LTSpice and be happy and buy a beer with the money you save. ;)
     
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  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    No simulation software will be completely accurate.

    It is very useful to validate a design; to see what it might do under perfect (and perhaps not so perfect) conditions.

    A SPICE simulation is only as good as the sum of it's inputs. Errors, like enemies, accumulate. Your mileage with real-world components may vary, and vary widely - depending upon how accurately your SPICE model reflected real-world conditions.
     
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  6. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
    3,373
    1,159
    I'm reminded of what J.A. Pierce said concerning his choice of 10.2 kHz as the frequency for Omega navigation. 60 Hz was causing interference and the 170th harmonic of 60 Hz is the Omega frequency.

    So, your designs can only improve as you know what is likely to cause the errors.

    Attached is a minute picture of the harmomics for 60 Hz I did in 1999. The model is not complete if I were working in the Omega frequency range.

    Elliot Sound Products has a nice model for tweeters and woofers.

    Your software should be able to create macro's (sub-circuits) from your circuit models.
     
  7. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
    795
    388
    I'm a big fan of Proteus, good stuff. But in the end your better off with a dev board.
     
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