electronic safe's

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by maneta007, Jun 1, 2007.

  1. maneta007

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 1, 2007
    2
    0
    I saw a battery powered electric safe at the store the other day, and I have wondered this..

    The batteries are installed and replace INSIDE the safe.. There's no combination lock, and it's exclusively a numeric pad..

    So um, what do you do when the batteries die? LOL
     
  2. Pootworm

    Member

    May 18, 2007
    29
    0
    That actually happened to me when I was an assistant manager at a retail store. I can tell you from experience that what you do is FREAK OUT. :)
     
  3. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    If it's not too expensive, give it as a gift to someone you don't like.
     
  4. mrmeval

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 30, 2006
    833
    2
    The more expensive ones have a backup key.
     
  5. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
    0
    better un-safe than sorry :D
     
  6. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    145
    Does someone want to try and give a logical reason for such a design? (Specifically the battery accessibility).

    Dave
     
  7. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    Get dynamite.
     
  8. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    I think the reason is because such manufacturers are simply stupid. They are not conscious that batteries tend to discharge themselves.
    Need more examples? Think Microsoft...LOL

    Also, probably they don't want the burglar to reset the safe by taking the battery out, but there are other solutions...that one is the worst one.
     
  9. Salgat

    Active Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    215
    1
    Is it possible to just bust open the keypad and put an external powersupply over the positive and negative bus?
     
  10. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    This design prevents the dead batteries from being stolen.:D

    Seriously, I think these safes were designed by salespeople. The batteries are inside to prevent tampering. Those other safes have batteries on the outside where anyone can get to them. You don't want folk being able to access the electronics, do you? Of course not! Pay more money for our protected battery design! Our even-higher-priced model has a "low battery" warning light.

    At least that's how the clerk explained it to me. I didn't buy one.
     
  11. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    145
    So we are in agreement - this design is one of the dumbest that could possibly have been conceived. The funny thing is that it was probably spun as a technical advantage by the salesmen. Oh well!

    Dave
     
  12. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Not quite. While in the Navy at a shore duty assignment, we had in the building a room that was very secret. It had an electronic lock on the door, which alarmed if the wrong numeral was pressed. On a long weekend, we went up and pressed buttons. The first one that did not sound the alarm was the first digit. It took a few minutes to find the others by the same methodology. Gotta have someone who cares before the alarm works.

    Lots of small waveguide plumbing inside, by the way.
     
  13. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    That code would be easy to find after a few tries. If the lock would accept or reject a code after a enter key was pressed (thus the code could have an undetermined number of digits), it would be a lot more difficult.
     
Loading...